Emergency Response

Emergency response is the overall plan, resources and responsibilities required to deal with a sudden or unexpected situation that requires immediate attention.

Emergency response is an important component of a workplace health and safety system. By identifying potential emergency situations and providing procedures and resources to control them, the workplace can minimize the impact of an emergency and the associated costs (both human and financial).

Emergency plans must be in place to address the safety hazards and potential emergency situations for the employer’s operations and location. As a minimum, per legislation, the plans would include policy and procedures regarding fires, first aid, rescue, and chemical accumulations, spills and leaks. Examples of other types of emergencies include violence, severe weather, pandemic, etc.

The occupational health committee should be consulted when developing, reviewing and revising emergency response plans.

An employer should:

  • Identify potential emergencies.
  • Develop emergency response plans for each potential emergency. The plan should describe the necessary steps and who is responsible for each one.
  • Provide applicable resources to address emergencies, such as fire extinguishers, first aid supplies, first aid personnel, eye wash stations; and ensure they are maintained in good working condition.
  • Provide training and ensure employees know their roles in the emergency response plans.
  • Post evacuation plans in highly visible places.
  • Take all reasonable practicable steps to prevent the outbreak of fire.
  • Test the plans by conducting drills. As a minimum, conduct fire drills at least annually.
  • Evaluate drills/emergencies and correct deficiencies.

Emergency response plans should, when applicable, include provisions for:

  • Sounding the alarm
  • Directing emergency response efforts
  • Evacuation/shelter in place (including muster points)
  • Accessing external resources or initiating rescue operations
  • Attending to casualties
  • Identifying quantities, locations and storage methods of all flammable substances

The following legislation is not all inclusive. You are responsible for knowing and complying with all legislation applicable to your place of employment. Please refer to the original legislation to find out exactly what requirements apply to your business. WorkSafe Saskatchewan does not offer any advice as to your obligations under any applicable legislation, and assumes no responsibility or liability for your obligations under the applicable legislation.

You can download copies of legislation for free from http://www.publications.gov.sk.ca/legislation.cfm.

SASKATCHEWAN EMPLOYMENT ACT

PART III

Occupational Health and Safety

DIVISION 3

Duties
Provision of information to medical personnel
Section 3-18 Provision of information to medical personnel

3‑18. (1) An employer shall, as soon as possible in the circumstances, provide any information exempted pursuant to subsection 3‑17(2) that is in the possession of the employer to any physician or registered nurse who requests the information for the purpose of making a medical diagnosis of, or rendering medical treatment to, a worker in an emergency.

(2) A physician or registered nurse to whom information is provided pursuant to subsection (1) shall:

(a) use the information only for the purpose for which it is provided; and

(b) keep confidential any information specified by the employer as confidential information.

Duty to provide occupational health and safety programs
Section 3-20 Duty to provide occupational health and safety programs

3‑20. (1) An employer at a prescribed place of employment shall establish and maintain an occupational health and safety program or a prescribed part of an occupational health and safety program in accordance with the regulations made pursuant to this Part.

(2) An occupational health and safety program at a prescribed place of employment must be established and designed in consultation with:

(a) the occupational health committee;

(b) the occupational health and safety representative; or

(c) the workers, if there is no occupational health committee and no occupational health and safety representative.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must include all prescribed documents, information and matters.

(4) An occupational health and safety program at a prescribed place of employment must be in writing and must be made available, on request, to the occupational health committee, the occupational health and safety representative, the workers or an occupational health officer.

(5) If the work at a place of employment is carried on pursuant to contracts between a contractor and two or more employers, the contractor shall coordinate the occupational health and safety programs of all employers at the place of employment.

(6) The director of occupational health and safety may order an employer to develop an occupational health and safety program for a place of employment if the director considers it to be in the interests of the health, safety and welfare of the employer’s workers based on the criteria set out in subsection (8).

(7) An order issued pursuant to subsection (6) must be in writing.

(8) In making an order pursuant to subsection (6), the director of occupational health and safety shall consider the following criteria:

(a) the frequency of occupationally related injuries and illnesses at the place of employment;

(b) the number and nature of the notices of contravention relating to the place of employment and the history of compliance with those orders and with compliance undertakings;

(c) any additional criteria that the director considers appropriate to protect the health, safety and welfare of workers.

Duty re policy statement on violence and prevention plan
Section 3-21 Duty re policy statement on violence and prevention plan

3‑21. (1) An employer operating at a prescribed place of employment where violent situations have occurred or may reasonably be expected to occur shall develop and implement a written policy statement and prevention plan to deal with potentially violent situations after consultation with:

(a) the occupational health committee;

(b) the occupational health and safety representative; or

(c) the workers, if there is no occupational health committee and no occupational health and safety representative.

(2) A policy statement and prevention plan required pursuant to subsection (1) must include any prescribed provisions.

DIVISION 7

Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System

Information re hazardous product
Section 3-49 Information re hazardous product

3‑49. As soon as is practicable in the circumstances, an employer shall provide, with respect to any hazardous product in a place of employment controlled by the employer, any information mentioned in clause 3‑48(e) that is in the possession of the employer to any physician or registered nurse who requests that information for the purpose of making a medical diagnosis of, or rendering medical treatment to, a worker in an emergency.

[S.S. 2015, c. 31, s. 3]

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 2020

PART 1

Preliminary Matters

Definitions and Interpretation
Section 1-2 Definitions and Interpretation

1‑2(1). In these regulations and in all other regulations made pursuant to the Act:

"Act" means The Saskatchewan Employment Act ;

"air‑purifying respirator" means a respirator that removes airborne contaminants from the air inhaled by a worker;

"approved" means:

(a) approved by an agency acceptable to the director for use in accordance with any terms and conditions determined by the agency; or

(b) approved by a certificate of the director subject to any terms and conditions the director considers appropriate;

"atmosphere‑supplying respirator" means a respirator that delivers clean breathing air to a worker from:

(a) a compressor or a cylinder;

(b) an SCBA that is closed or open circuit; or

(c) a combination of an SCBA and supplied air; "borehole" means a mechanically drilled hole in the ground;

"building shaft" means a continuous vertical space substantially enclosed on all sides that extends for 2 or more floors, and includes an elevator shaft, a ventilation shaft, a stairwell and a service shaft;

"class A qualification" means a certificate that:

(a) is issued by an agency, as defined in section 5‑1, with respect to the successful completion of a first aid training course and a cardiopulmonary resuscitation training course that meet the minimum requirements for course duration and content set out in Table 1 of the Appendix; and

(b) qualifies the holder to perform the services set out in Table 2 of the Appendix;

"class B qualification" means a certificate that:

(a) is issued by an agency, as defined in section 5‑1, with respect to the successful completion of a first aid training course and a cardiopulmonary resuscitation training course that meet the minimum requirements for course duration and content set out in Table 3 of the Appendix; and

(b) qualifies the holder to perform the services set out in Table 4 of the Appendix;

"Class C fire" means a fire involving energized electrical equipment;

"co‑chairpersons’ means, with respect to a committee, the worker co‑chairperson elected pursuant to clause 4‑6(1) (a) and the employer or contractor co‑chairperson appointed pursuant to clause 4‑6(1) (b);

"committee" means an occupational health committee;

"competent" means competent as defined in Part III of the Act;

"competent worker", with respect to a particular task or duty, includes a worker who is being trained to perform that task or carry out that duty and who is under close and competent supervision during that training;

"connecting linkage" means a lanyard, safety hook, cable or connector inserted between a personal fall arrest system and the D‑ring on a worker’s full‑body harness;

"construction" means the erection, alteration, renovation, repair, dismantling, demolition, structural maintenance and painting of a structure, and includes:

(a) land clearing, earth moving, grading, excavating, trenching, digging, boring, drilling, blasting and concreting; and

(b) the installation of any plant;

"dBA" means the sound pressure level in decibels measured on the A scale of a sound level meter;

"dBA Lex" means the level of a worker’s total exposure to noise, in dBA, averaged over an entire workday and adjusted to an equivalent 8‑hour exposure;

"designated signaller" means a worker designated pursuant to clause 9‑21(1) (a) to give signals;

"director" means the director of occupational health and safety;

"escape respirator" means an atmosphere‑supplying respirator or an air‑purifying respirator that is designed to be used by a worker for escape purposes only;

"excavated shaft" means a dug‑out passage into the ground, the longest dimension of which exceeds 1.5 metres and of which the acute angle between the axis of the longest dimension and the vertical is less than 45°;

"excavation" means any dug‑out area of ground but does not include a trench, tunnel or excavated shaft;

"first aid" means immediate assistance given in case of injury until medical aid has been obtained;

"first aid attendant" means the holder of a valid:

(a) class A qualification;

(b) class B qualification;

(c) licence to practise issued pursuant to The Paramedics Act; or

(d) licence, certificate or other qualification that, in the opinion of the director, is equivalent to or superior to a qualification set out in clauses (a) to (c);

"first aid register" means the register required by section 5‑8;

"first aid station" means a work‑related area containing the supplies and equipment required by subsection 5‑7(1);

"forklift" means a self‑propelled machine that has a power‑operated upright, angled or telescoping lifting device that can raise and lower a load for the purpose of transporting or stacking;

"full‑body harness" means a safety device that:

(a) is capable of suspending a worker without causing the worker to bend at the waist; and

(b) consists of straps that pass over the worker’s shoulders and around the worker’s legs, an upper dorsal suspension assembly and all integral hardware;

"hand tool" means hand‑held equipment that is powered by the energy of a worker;

"harmful" means known to cause harm or injury;

"hazardous" means likely to cause harm or injury in certain circumstances;

"hazardous product" means a hazardous product as defined in the Hazardous Products Act (Canada);

"HEPA filter" means a high‑efficiency particulate aerosol filter that is at least 99.97% efficient in collecting a 0.3 micrometre aerosol;

"hoist" means a machine that consists of a raising and lowering mechanism;

"immediately dangerous to life or health" means a condition in which a hazardous atmosphere exists to such an extent that a worker who is not using an approved respiratory protective device will suffer escape‑impairing or irreversible health effects if the worker does not leave the hazardous atmosphere within 30 minutes;

"instruct" means to give information and direction to a worker with respect to particular subject‑matter;

"lifeline" means a length of rope or strap that is attached to a safe point of anchorage at 1 end or, in the case of a horizontal lifeline, at both ends to provide support and a guide for a personal fall arrest system or personnel lowering device;

"licence to practise" means a licence to practise issued pursuant to The Paramedics Act;

"locked out" means to have isolated the energy source or sources from equipment, to have dissipated any residual energy in a system and to have secured the isolation by a device that is operated by a key or other process;

"machine" means any combination of mechanical parts that transmits from 1 part to another or otherwise modifies force, motion or energy;

"maintained" means kept in a condition of efficient and safe functioning by a system of regular examination, testing and servicing or repair;

"The Mines Regulations" means The Mines Regulations, 2018;

"officer" means an occupational health officer;

"operator" means a person who operates any equipment;

"percutaneous" means a route of entry that is through the skin or mucous membrane and includes subcutaneous, intramuscular and intravascular routes of entry;

"personal fall arrest system" means personal protective equipment that:

(a) provides a means of safely arresting the fall of a worker; and

(b) subsequent to the arrest of the fall, does not by itself permit the further release or lowering of the worker;

"personal protective equipment" means any clothing, device or other article that is intended to be worn or used by a worker to prevent injury or to facilitate rescue;

"personnel lowering device" means a device that provides a means of lowering a worker from a height at a controlled rate of descent;

"power tool" means a hand‑held machine that is powered by energy other than the energy of a worker;

"powered mobile equipment" means a self‑propelled machine or a combination of machines, including a prime mover, that is designed to manipulate or move materials or to provide a work platform for workers;

"professional engineer" means a professional engineer as defined in The Engineering and Geoscience Professions Act;

"public highway" means a public highway as defined in The Highways and Transportation Act, 1997 ;

"qualified" means possessing a recognized degree, a recognized certificate or a recognized professional standing and demonstrating, by knowledge, training and experience, the ability to deal with problems related to the subject‑matter, the work or the project;

"representative" means an occupational health and safety representative;

"respiratory protective device" means a device that is designed to protect a wearer from inhaling a hazardous atmosphere, and includes an atmosphere‑supplying respirator, an air‑purifying respirator and an escape respirator;

"safeguard" means a guard, shield, wire mesh, guardrail, gate, barrier, safety net, handrail or other similar equipment that is designed to protect the safety of workers, but does not include personal protective equipment;

"SCBA" means self‑contained breathing apparatus; "supervisor" means a supervisor as defined in Part III of the Act;

"train" means train as defined in Part III of the Act;

"travelway" means any place where workers or vehicles regularly travel or pass, and includes a ramp, runway, catwalk, bridge, conveyor, gantry or passage;

"trench" means an elongated dug‑out area of land that has a depth that exceeds its width at the bottom;

"tunnel" means an underground passage that has an incline of not more than 45° from the horizontal;

"vehicle" means a machine in, on or by which a person or thing may be transported, and includes powered mobile equipment;

"work" and "at work" means:

(a) the time during which a worker is in the course of the worker’s employment; or

(b) the time that a self‑employed person devotes to work as a self‑employed person;

"work‑related area" means all places that are ancillary to a place of employment, and includes lunchrooms, restrooms, first aid rooms, lecture rooms, parking lots under the control of the employer or contractor, offices and work camp living accommodations, but does not include a permanent living accommodation.

(2) For the purposes of the Act, these regulations and all other regulations made pursuant to the Act, "injury" includes any disease and any impairment of the physical or mental condition of a person.

(3) Any word or expression used but not defined in these regulations or the Act has the meaning commonly given to it at places of employment in the industry concerned.

(4) Unless otherwise expressly stated:

(a) lumber sizes specified in these regulations are lumber sizes after dressing; and

(b) "lumber" means lumber that is free of visible defects.

PART 2

Notice Requirements

Accidents causing serious bodily injury
Section 2-2 Accidents causing serious bodily injury

2‑2(1). An employer or contractor shall give notice to the ministry as soon as is reasonably possible of every accident at a place of employment that:

(a) causes or may cause the death of a worker; or

(b) will require a worker to be admitted to a hospital as an in‑patient for a period of 72 hours or more.

(2) The notice required by subsection (1) must include:

(a) the name of each injured or deceased worker;

(b) the name of the employer of each injured or deceased worker;

(c) the date, time and location of the accident;

(d) the circumstances related to the accident;

(e) the apparent injuries; and

(f) the name, telephone number and fax number of the employer or contractor or a person designated by the employer or contractor to be contacted for additional information.

(3) An employer or contractor shall provide each co‑chairperson or the representative with a copy of the notice required by subsection (1).

Dangerous occurrences
Section 2-3 Dangerous occurrences

2‑3(1) In this section, "dangerous occurrence" means any occurrence that does not result in, but could have resulted in, a condition or circumstance set out in subsection 2‑2(1), and includes:

(a) the structural failure or collapse of:

(i) a structure, scaffold, temporary falsework or concrete formwork; or

(ii) all or any part of an excavated shaft, tunnel, caisson, coffer dam, trench or excavation;

(b) the failure of a crane or hoist or the overturning of a crane or unit of powered mobile equipment;

(c) an accidental contact with an energized electrical conductor;

(d) the bursting of a grinding wheel;

(e) an uncontrolled spill or escape of a toxic, corrosive or explosive substance;

(f) a premature detonation or accidental detonation of explosives;

(g) the failure of an elevated or suspended platform; and

(h) the failure of an atmosphere‑supplying respirator.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall give notice to the ministry as soon as is reasonably possible of any dangerous occurrence that takes place at a place of employment, whether or not a worker sustains injury.

(3) A notice required by subsection (2) must include:

(a) the name of each employer, contractor and owner at the place of employment;

(b) the date, time and location of the dangerous occurrence;

(c) the circumstances related to the dangerous occurrence; and

(d) the name, telephone number and fax number of the employer, contractor or owner or a person designated by the employer, contractor or owner to be contacted for additional information.

(4) An employer, contractor or owner shall provide each co‑chairperson or the representative with a copy of the notice required by subsection (2).

PART 3

General Duties

Duty of contractor to inform
Section 3-5 Duty of contractor to inform

3‑5(1). A contractor shall give notice in writing to every employer, worker or self‑employed person at the place of employment, setting out:

(a) the name of the person who is supervising the work on behalf of the contractor;

(b) any emergency facilities provided by the contractor for the use of the employers’ workers or self‑employed persons; and

(c) the existence of a committee or representative, if any, at the place of employment and the means to contact the committee or representative.

(2) Subsection (1) applies only to contractors at major construction projects and to contractors involved in those activities to which Part 29 applies.

Supervision of work
Section 3-6 Supervision of work

3‑6(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) all work at a place of employment is sufficiently and competently supervised;

(b) supervisors have sufficient knowledge of all of the following with respect to matters that are within the scope of the supervisor’s responsibility:

(i) the Act and any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the place of employment;

(ii) any occupational health and safety program at the place of employment;

(iii) the safe handling, use, storage, production and disposal of chemical and biological substances;

(iv) the need for, and safe use of, personal protective equipment;

(v) emergency procedures required by these regulations;

(vi) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of workers under the supervisor’s direction; and

(c) supervisors comply with the Act and any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the place of employment and ensure that the workers under their direction comply with the Act and those regulations.

(2) A supervisor shall ensure that the workers under the supervisor’s direction comply with the Act and any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the place of employment.

Training of workers
Section 3-8 Training of workers

3‑8(1). An employer shall ensure that a worker is trained in all matters that are necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker when the worker:

(a) begins work at a place of employment; or

(b) is moved from 1 work activity or worksite to another that differs with respect to hazards, facilities or procedures.

(2) The training required by subsection (1) must include:

(a) procedures to be taken in the event of a fire or other emergency;

(b) the location of first aid facilities;

(c) identification of prohibited or restricted areas;

(d) precautions to be taken for the protection of the worker from physical, chemical or biological hazards;

(e) any procedures, plans, policies and programs that the employer is required to develop pursuant to the Act or any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the worker’s work at the place of employment; and

(f) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of the worker while the worker is at work.

(3) An employer shall ensure that:

(a) the time spent by a worker in the training required by subsection (1) is credited to the worker as time at work; and

(b) the worker does not lose pay or other benefits with respect to that time.

(4) An employer shall ensure that no worker is permitted to perform work unless the worker:

(a) has been trained, and has sufficient experience, to perform the work safely and in compliance with the Act and the regulations; or

(b) is under close and competent supervision.

Occupational health and safety program
Section 3-11 Occupational health and safety program

3‑11(1). Subject to subsection (2), an occupational health and safety program required by section 3‑20 of the Act must include:

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of the workers;

(b) the identification of existing and potential risks to the health or safety of workers at the place of employment and the measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate or control those risks;

(c) the identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that may be required to respond to an emergency;

(d) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(e) a schedule for the regular inspection of the place of employment and of work processes and procedures;

(f) a plan for the control of any biological or chemical substance handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the place of employment and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(g) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including any procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop pursuant to the Act or any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the work of the workers and supervisors;

(h) a procedure for the investigation of accidents, dangerous occurrences and refusals to work pursuant to section 3‑31 of the Act at the place of employment;

(i) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of accidents, dangerous occurrences and refusals to work pursuant to section 3‑31 of the Act; and

(j) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program at specified intervals that are not greater than 3 years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that may affect the health or safety of workers.

(2) The places of employment set out in Table 7 of the Appendix with 10 or more workers are prescribed for the purposes of section 3‑20 of the Act.

(3) An employer at a place of employment mentioned in subsection (2) shall establish an occupational health and safety program that meets the requirements set out in subsection (1).

Investigation of certain accidents
Section 3-18 Investigation of certain accidents

3‑18(1). Subject to section 3‑19, an employer shall ensure that every accident that causes or may cause the death of a worker or that requires a worker to be admitted to a hospital as an in‑patient for a period of 24 hours or more is investigated as soon as is reasonably possible by:

(a) the co‑chairpersons or their designates;

(b) the employer and the representative; or

(c) if there is no committee or representative, the employer.

(2) After the investigation of an accident, an employer, in consultation with the co‑chairpersons or the their designates, or with the representative, shall prepare a written report that includes:

(a) a description of the accident;

(b) any graphics, photographs or other evidence that may assist in determining the cause or causes of the accident;

(c) an explanation of the cause or causes of the accident;

(d) the immediate corrective action taken; and

(e) any long‑term action that will be taken to prevent the occurrence of a similar accident or the reasons for not taking action.

Prohibition re scene of accident
Section 3-19 Prohibition re scene of accident

3‑19(1). Unless expressly authorized by statute or by subsection (2), no person shall, except for the purpose of saving life or relieving human suffering, interfere with, destroy, carry away or alter the position of any wreckage, article, document or thing at the scene of or connected with an accident causing a death until an officer has completed an investigation of the circumstances surrounding the accident.

(2) When an accident causing a death occurs and an officer is not able to complete an investigation of the circumstances surrounding the accident, an officer may, unless prohibited by statute, grant permission to move the wreckage, articles and things at the scene or connected with the accident to any extent that may be necessary to allow the work to proceed, only if:

(a) graphics, photographs or other evidence showing details at the scene of the accident are made before the officer grants permission; and

(b) the co‑chairpersons of a committee or the representative for the place of employment at which the accident occurred or their designates have inspected the site of the accident and agreed that the wreckage, article or thing may be moved.

Investigation of dangerous occurrences
Section 3-20 Investigation of dangerous occurrences

3‑20(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that every dangerous occurrence as defined in subsection 2‑3(1) is investigated as soon as is reasonably possible by:

(a) the co‑chairpersons or their designates;

(b) the employer, contractor or owner and the representative; or

(c) if there is no committee or representative, the employer, contractor or owner.

(2) After the investigation of a dangerous occurrence, an employer, contractor or owner, in consultation with the co‑chairpersons or their designates or with the representative, shall prepare a written report that includes:

(a) a description of the dangerous occurrence;

(b) any graphics, photographs or other evidence that may assist in determining the cause or causes of the dangerous occurrence;

(c) an explanation of the cause or causes of the dangerous occurrence;

(d) the immediate corrective action taken; and

(e) any long‑term action that will be taken to prevent the occurrence of a similar dangerous occurrence or the reasons for not taking action.

Injuries requiring medical treatment
Section 3-21 Injuries requiring medical treatment

3‑21(1). An employer or contractor shall report to the co‑chairpersons, the representative or their designates any lost‑time injury at the place of employment that results in a worker receiving medical treatment.

(2) The employer or contractor shall allow the co‑chairpersons, the representative or their designates a reasonable opportunity to review the lost‑time injury mentioned in subsection (1) during normal working hours and without loss of pay or other benefits.

Work where visibility is restricted
Section 3-22 Work where visibility is restricted

3‑22. If visibility in an area at a place of employment is restricted by smoke, steam or any other substance to the extent that a worker is at risk of injury, an employer or contractor shall not require or permit the worker to work in that area unless the employer or contractor provides the worker with an effective means of communication with another worker who is readily available to provide assistance in an emergency.

Working alone or at isolated place of employment
Section 3-24 Working alone or at isolated place of employment

3‑24(1). In this section, "to work alone" means to work at a worksite as the only worker of the employer or contractor at that worksite, in circumstances where assistance is not readily available to the worker in the event of injury, ill health or emergency.

(2) If a worker is required to work alone or at an isolated place of employment, an employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, the representative or, if there is no committee or representative, the workers, shall identify the risks arising from the conditions and circumstances of the worker’s work or the isolation of the place of employment.

(3) An employer or contractor shall take all reasonably practicable steps to eliminate or reduce the risks identified pursuant to subsection (2).

(4) The steps to be taken to eliminate or reduce the risks pursuant to subsection (3):

(a) must include the establishment of an effective communication system that consists of:

(i) radio communication;

(ii) phone or cellular phone communication; or

(iii) any other means that provides effective communication in view of the risks involved; and

(b) may include any of the following:

(i) regular contact by the employer or contractor with the worker working alone or at an isolated place of employment;

(ii) limitations on, or prohibitions of, specified activities;

(iii) establishment of minimum training or experience, or other standards of competency;

(iv) provision of personal protective equipment;

(v) establishment of safe work practices or procedures;

(vi) provision of emergency supplies for use in travelling under conditions of extreme cold or other inclement weather conditions.

Violence
Section 3-26 Violence

3‑26(1). In this section, "violence" means the attempted, threatened or actual conduct of a person that causes or is likely to cause injury, and includes any threatening statement or behaviour that gives a worker reasonable cause to believe that the worker is at risk of injury.

(2) Places of employment that provide the following services or activities are prescribed for the purposes of subsection 3‑21(1) of the Act:

(a) services provided by health care facilities mentioned in clauses (a) to (e) and (l) of the definition of "health care facilities" in section 31‑1;

(b) pharmaceutical‑dispensing services;

(c) education services;

(d) police services;

(e) corrections services;

(f) other law enforcement services;

(g) security services;

(h) crisis counselling and intervention services;

(i) late night retail premises as defined in section 3‑27;

(j) financial services;

(k) the sale of alcoholic beverages or the provision of premises for the consumption of alcoholic beverages;

(l) taxi services;

(m) transit services.

(3) A policy statement and prevention plan required by subsection 3‑21(1) of the Act must be in writing and must include:

(a) the employer’s commitment to minimize or eliminate the risk;

(b) the identification of the worksites where violent situations have occurred or may reasonably be expected to occur;

(c) the identification of any staff positions at the place of employment that have been, or may reasonably be expected to be, exposed to violent situations;

(d) the procedure to be followed by the employer to inform workers of the nature and extent of risk from violence, including, except if the disclosure is prohibited by law, any information in the employer’s possession related to the risk of violence from persons who have a history of violent behaviour and whom workers are likely to encounter in the course of their work;

(e) the actions the employer will take to minimize or eliminate the risk, including the use of personal protective equipment, administrative arrangements and engineering controls;

(f) the procedure to be followed by a worker who has been exposed to a violent incident to report the incident to the employer;

(g) the procedure the employer will follow to document and investigate a violent incident reported pursuant to clause (f);

(h) a recommendation that any worker who has been exposed to a violent incident consult the worker’s physician for treatment or referral for post incident counselling; and

(i) the employer’s commitment to provide a training program for workers that includes:

(i) the means to recognize potentially violent situations;

(ii) procedures, work practices, administrative arrangements and engineering controls that have been developed to minimize or eliminate the risk to workers;

(iii) the appropriate responses of workers to incidents of violence, including how to obtain assistance; and

(iv) procedures for reporting violent incidents.

(4) If a worker receives treatment or counselling mentioned in clause (3) (h) or attends a training program mentioned in clause (3) (i), an employer shall credit the worker’s attendance as time at work and ensure that the worker loses no pay or other benefits.

(5) An employer shall make readily available for reference by workers a copy of the policy statement and prevention plan required by subsection 3‑21(1) of the Act.

(6) An employer shall ensure that the policy statement and prevention plan required by subsection 3‑21(1) of the Act is reviewed and, if necessary, revised every 3 years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that may affect the health or safety of workers.

Safety measures - retail premises
Section 3-27 Safety measures - retail premises

3‑27(1). In this section, "late night retail premises" means a place of employment that is open to the public between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. for the purposes of making retail sales to consumers.

(2) In addition to the requirements imposed by sections 3‑24 and 3‑26, an employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall conduct a workplace hazard assessment in accordance with an approved industry standard.

(3) The employer shall conduct the workplace hazard assessment required by subsection (2):

(a) in the case of an employer who operates a late night retail premises on the day on which this section comes into force, as soon as is reasonably practicable after the day on which this section comes into force;

(b) in the case of an employer who operates a place of employment that becomes a late night retail premises after the day on which this section comes into force, as soon as is reasonably practicable after the day on which the place of employment became a late night retail premises.

(4) An employer shall ensure that the workplace hazard assessment required by subsection (2) is reviewed and, if necessary, revised every 3 years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that may affect the health or safety of workers.

(5) In addition to the requirements of sections 3‑24 and 3‑26, an employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall implement the following security measures:

(a) the development of written safe cash handling procedures that minimize the amount of money that is readily accessible to the worker in the establishment;

(b) the use of video cameras that capture key areas in the workplace, including the cash desk and the outdoor gas pumps, if applicable;

(c) the establishment of measures to ensure good visibility into and out of the premises; and (d) the placement of signs to indicate:

(i) the worker’s limited accessibility to cash and valuables; and

(ii) the use of video cameras on the premises.

(6) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises that has 1 worker working alone between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. shall, in addition to the requirements set out in section 3‑24 and subsection (5):

(a) implement a check‑in system and a written check‑in procedure for that worker; and

(b) provide a personal emergency transmitter to be worn by the worker that signals for emergency response when activated.

PART 5

First Aid

Definitions for Part
Section 5-1 Definitions for Part

5‑1. In this Part:

"agency" means a body, person, association, society or other organization that delivers first aid training courses and cardiopulmonary resuscitation training courses by 1 or more competent instructors;

"close", in relation to a place of employment or worksite, means a place of employment or worksite that is not more than 30 minutes’ travel time from a hospital or medical facility under normal travel conditions using the available means of transportation by road;

"CSA standard" means the Canadian Standards Agency standard CSA Z1220‑17 , First aid kits for the workplace;

"high‑hazard work" means work regularly involving any activity set out in Table 8 of the Appendix;

"instructor" means a person who has successfully completed first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructor training;

"low‑hazard work" means work of an administrative, professional or clerical nature that does not require substantial physical exertion or exposure to potentially hazardous conditions, work processes or substances;

"medical facility" means a medical clinic or office where a physician or registered nurse is always readily available;

"risk" means a combination of the likelihood of the occurrence of harm and the severity of that harm;

"workplace first aid risk assessment" means a process to determine the risk level in a workplace as it relates to the provision of workplace first aid services, first aid kits and supplies as defined in CSA standard.

Application
Section 5-2 Application

5‑2. This Part does not apply to:

(a) a hospital, medical clinic, physician’s office, nursing home or other health care facility where a physician or a registered nurse is always readily available; or

(b) a close place of employment at which the work performed is entirely low‑hazard work.

Provision of first aid
Section 5-3 Provision of first aid

5‑3. Subject to section 5‑4, an employer, contractor or owner shall:

(a) provide the personnel, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation required by this Part to render prompt and appropriate first aid to workers at every worksite;

(b) subject to clause (c), provide first aid supplies and equipment that meet the appropriate classification and minium requirements for the place of employment or worksite as set out in CSA standard;

(c) undertake a workplace first aid risk assessment conducted by a competent person to determine the appropriate classification for the place of employment or worksite in accordance with the guidelines as set out in Annex A of CSA standard;

(d) in consultation with the committee, the representative or, if there is no committee or representative, the workers, review the provisions of this Part;

(e) if the provisions of this Part are not adequate to meet any specific hazard at a place of employment, provide additional suitable personnel, supplies, equipment and facilities that are appropriate for the hazard; and

(f) ensure that, if a worker may be entrapped or incapacitated in a situation that may be dangerous to any person involved in the rescue operation:

(i) an effective written procedure for the rescue of that worker is developed; and

(ii) suitable personnel and rescue equipment are provided.

More than 1 employer
Section 5-4 More than 1 employer

5‑4(1). If more than 1 employer has workers at the same place of employment:

(a) the employers and any contractor or owner may agree in writing to provide collectively the personnel, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation for injured workers required by this Part; or

(b) the director may, by notice in writing, require all employers, contractors and owners to provide collectively the personnel, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation for injured workers required by this Part.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1), the total number of workers of all employers at the place of employment is deemed to be the number of workers at the place of employment.

First aid personnel
Section 5-5 First aid personnel

5‑5(1). An employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide the personnel set out in Table 9 of the Appendix for:

(i) the level of risk associated with the work carried out at the place of employment as determined by a workplace first aid risk assessment; and

(ii) the number of workers at the place of employment at any one time; and

(b) ensure that the personnel are readily available during working hours.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the personnel required pursuant to subsection (1) have the qualifications set out in Table 1 or Table 3 of the Appendix, as the case may require.

(3) A person who possesses credentials in first aid that, in the opinion of the director, are equivalent to or superior to the credentials required for a place of employment may serve as a first aid attendant at that place of employment.

(4) If rescue personnel are required by these regulations to be provided at a worksite, an employer or contractor shall ensure that at least 1 first aid attendant with a class A qualification is readily available during working hours, whether or not the employer or contractor is required to provide a class A first aid attendant pursuant to subsection (1).

(5) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Part, if an employer, contractor or owner provides lodging for workers at or near an isolated or distant place of employment, the employer, contractor or owner shall provide the personnel, supplies, equipment and facilities required pursuant to section 5‑3(b) and Table 9 of the Appendix based on the total number of workers at or near the place of employment, whether or not the workers are all working at any one time.

(6) An employer or contractor shall:

(a) allow a first aid attendant and any other worker that the first aid attendant needs for assistance to provide prompt and adequate first aid to a worker who has been injured or taken ill; and

(b) ensure that the first aid attendant and any worker assisting the first aid attendant have adequate time, with no loss of pay or other benefits, to provide the first aid.

Certificates
Section 5-6 Certificates

5‑6(1). No certificate issued by an agency is valid for the purposes of this Part unless the certificate specifies the duration and content of the course for which the certificate is issued and the expiry date of the certificate.

(2) A certificate may specify:

(a) a period not exceeding 3 years for which the certificate is valid; and

(b) the conditions for the renewal of the certificate.

First aid station
Section 5-7 First aid station

5‑7(1). An employer or contractor shall provide and maintain for every worksite a readily accessible first aid station that contains:

(a) a first aid kit containing the supplies and equipment mentioned in section 5‑3(b);

(b) a suitable first aid manual; and

(c) any other supplies and equipment required by these regulations.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the location of a first aid station is clearly and conspicuously identified; and

(b) at a first aid station, an appropriate emergency procedure is prominently displayed that includes:

(i) an emergency telephone list or other instructions for reaching the nearest fire, police, ambulance, physician, hospital or other appropriate service; and

(ii) any written rescue procedure required by subclause 5‑3(f) (i).

First aid room
Section 5-9 First aid room

5‑9. If there are likely to be 100 or more workers at a distant or isolated place of employment at any one time, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide a first aid room that:

(a) is of adequate size, is clean and is provided with adequate lighting, ventilation and heating;

(b) is equipped with:

(i) a permanently installed sink, with hot and cold water;

(ii) the first aid supplies and equipment required by this Part; and

(iii) a cot or bed with a moisture‑protected mattress and pillows;

(c) is readily accessible to workers;

(d) is under the charge of a first aid attendant with the qualifications required by this Part who is readily available to provide first aid; and

(e) is used exclusively for the purposes of administering first aid and medical examinations and to provide rest for persons who are injured or ill.

Workers being transported
Section 5-10 Workers being transported

5‑10. If workers are being transported by an employer or contractor to or from work or at work, and a first aid station, medical clinic, physician’s office, hospital or other health care facility is not readily available, an employer or contractor shall provide a first aid kit that contains at least the supplies and equipment that are consistent with the requirements in CSA standard and that is readily available to the workers being transported.

First aid suppliers and equipment
Section 5-11 First aid supplies and equipment

5‑11(1). An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) all first aid supplies and equipment are protected and kept in a clean and dry state;

(b) no supplies, equipment or materials other than supplies and equipment for first aid are kept in the first aid kit mentioned in clause 5‑7(1) (a).

(2) At a place of employment where a first aid attendant is required pursuant to section 5‑5, an employer or contractor shall provide the additional first aid supplies and equipment necessary to perform the duties if:

(a) a first aid attendant with a class A qualification is required;

(b) a first aid attendant with a class B qualification is required; or

(c) a person with licence to practise is required.

(3) An employer or contractor shall provide and make readily accessible to workers any additional specialized first aid supplies or equipment as determined by a workplace first aid risk assessment.

Transportation of injured workers
Section 5-12 Transportation of injured workers

5‑12(1). An employer or contractor shall ensure that a means of transportation for injured workers to a medical facility or hospital is available.

(2) The following meet the requirements of subsection (1):

(a) an ambulance service that is within 30 minutes’ travel time from the ambulance base to the place of employment under normal travel conditions; or

(b) a means of transportation that is suitable, having regard to the distance to be travelled and the risks to which workers are exposed, that affords protection against the weather and is equipped, if reasonably practicable, with a means of communication that permits contact with the medical facility or hospital to which the injured worker is being transported and with the place of employment.

(3) If a stretcher is required to be provided in accordance with a workplace first aid risk assessment, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the means of transportation provided pursuant to clause (2) (b) is capable of accommodating and securing an occupied stretcher.

(4) An employer or contractor shall provide a means of communication to summon the transportation required by subsection (1).

(5) If a worker is seriously injured or, in the opinion of a first aid attendant, needs to be accompanied during transportation, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker is accompanied by a first aid attendant during transportation.

Asphyxiation and poisoning
Section 5-13 Asphyxiation and poisoning

5‑13. If a worker is at risk of asphyxiation or poisoning, an employer or contractor shall ensure that all practicable emergency arrangements are made for the rescue of the worker and for the prompt provision of antidotes, supportive measures, first aid, medical attention and any other measures that are appropriate to the nature and probable effects of the asphyxia or poisoning.

Additional provisions
Section 5-14 Additional provisions

5‑14. If, in the opinion of the director, first aid and emergency arrangements at a place of employment or worksite are inadequate, the director may, by notice in writing, require the employer or contractor to make additional provisions.

PART 6

General Health Requirements

Sanitation
Section 6-1 Sanitation

6‑1(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a place of employment is sanitary and kept as clean as is reasonably practicable and shall ensure, to the extent that is reasonably practicable, that:

(a) dirt and debris are removed at least daily by a suitable method from all floors, working surfaces, stairways and passages;

(b) floors are cleaned at least once each week by washing, vacuum cleaning or any other effective and suitable method; and

(c) all inside walls, partitions, ceilings, passages and staircases are clean and are suitably finished and maintained.

(2) If a worker may be exposed to refuse, spills or waste materials that may pose a risk to the worker’s health or safety, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the refuse, spill or waste material is removed by a suitable method from the worksite as soon as is reasonably practicable.

Mechanical ventilation
Section 6-3 Mechanical ventilation

6‑3(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall provide a mechanical ventilation system in a place of employment that is sufficient and suitable to protect the workers against inhalation of a contaminant and to prevent accumulation of the contaminant and ensure that the mechanical ventilation system is maintained and properly used, if any work, activity or process in the place of employment gives off:

(a) a dust, fume, gas, mist, aerosol or vapour or other contaminant of a kind and quantity that is likely to be hazardous to workers; or

(b) substantial quantities of contaminants of any kind.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner who provides a mechanical ventilation system at a place of employment, whether required by subsection (1) or not, shall ensure that the system provides sufficient fresh and tempered air to replace the air exhausted by ventilation.

(3) If practicable, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a mechanical ventilation system required by subsection (1):

(a) includes local exhaust ventilation that is installed and maintained at or near the point of origin of the contaminant so as to prevent effectively the contaminant from entering the air of the place of employment; and

(b) is equipped with a device that will provide a warning to workers when the system is not working effectively.

(4) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that contaminants removed by a mechanical ventilation system required by subsection (1) are:

(a) exhausted clear of the place of employment; and

(b) if reasonably practicable, prevented from entering any place of employment.

(5) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that effective provision is made for the immediate protection of workers in the event of failure of a mechanical ventilation system required by subsection (1).

(6) If an air cleaning system is used to clean recirculated air, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the air cleaning system is designed, installed and maintained to remove particulate and gaseous contaminants at a rate that is sufficient to protect the health and safety of workers and, if it is reasonably practicable, to render the air inoffensive.

Lighting
Section 6-6 Lighting

6‑6(1). While workers are present at a worksite, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide lighting that is sufficient to protect the health and safety of workers and suitable for the work to be done at the worksite.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the illumination of all parts of a place of employment where workers pass, other than underground at a mine, is at least 5 decalux.

(3) If failure of the regular lighting system is likely to create conditions dangerous to the health or safety of workers, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide appropriate emergency lighting of at least 5 decalux for the worksite and exit routes from the worksite.

(4) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) light fixtures, windows and skylights that provide light for work are, if practicable, kept clean and free from any obstruction, except for special treatment of light fixtures, windows or skylights to reduce heat or glare; and

(b) artificial light sources and reflective surfaces are positioned, screened or provided with a shade, if practicable, to prevent glare or the formation of shadows that cause discomfort or a risk of accident to a worker.

Thermal conditions
Section 6-7 Thermal conditions

6‑7(1). Subject to subsection (3), in an indoor place of employment, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide and maintain thermal conditions, including air temperature, radiant temperature, humidity and air movement, that:

(a) are appropriate to the nature of the work performed;

(b) provide effective protection for the health and safety of workers; and

(c) provide reasonable thermal comfort for workers.

(2) At an indoor place of employment where the thermal environment is likely to be a health or safety concern to the workers, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide and maintain an appropriate and suitably located instrument for measuring the thermal conditions.

(3) If it is not reasonably practicable to control thermal conditions or if work is being performed outdoors, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide and maintain measures for:

(a) the effective protection of the health and safety of workers; and

(b) the reasonable thermal comfort of workers.

(4) Measures for the purposes set out in subsection (3) may include, but are not limited to, the following:

(a) frequent monitoring of thermal conditions;

(b) the provision of special or temporary equipment, including screens, shelters and temporary heating or cooling equipment;

(c) the provision of suitable clothing or personal protective equipment;

(d) the provision of hot or cold drinks;

(e) the use of acclimatization or other physiological procedures;

(f) the use of limited work schedules with rest and recovery periods, changes in workloads, changes in hours or other arrangements for work;

(g) frequent observation of workers by a person who is trained to recognize the symptoms of physiological stress resulting from extreme temperatures;

(h) the provision of emergency supplies for use when travelling under extremely cold or inclement weather conditions.

(5) If a worker is required to work in thermal conditions that are different from those associated with the worker’s normal duties, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, any suitable clothing or other personal protective equipment that is necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker.

Musculoskeletal injuries
Section 6-18 Musculoskeletal injuries

6‑18(1). In this section, "musculoskeletal injury" means an injury or disorder of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, joints, bones or supporting vasculature that may be caused or aggravated by any of the following:

(a) repetitive motions;

(b) forceful exertions;

(c) vibration;

(d) mechanical compression;

(e) sustained or awkward postures;

(f) limitations on motion or action;

(g) other ergonomic stressors.

(2) An employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall regularly review the activities at the place of employment that may cause or aggravate musculoskeletal injuries.

(3) If a risk of musculoskeletal injury is identified, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) inform each worker who may be at risk of developing musculoskeletal injury of that risk and of the signs and common symptoms of any musculoskeletal injury associated with that worker’s work; and

(b) provide effective protection for each worker who may be at risk, which may include any of the following:

(i) providing equipment that is designed, constructed, positioned and maintained to reduce the harmful effects of an activity;

(ii) implementing appropriate work practices and procedures to reduce the harmful effects of an activity;

(iii) implementing work schedules that incorporate rest and recovery periods, changes in workload or other arrangements for alternating work to reduce the harmful effects of an activity.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that workers who may be at risk of developing musculoskeletal injury are instructed in the safe performance of the worker’s work, including the use of appropriate work practices and procedures, equipment and personal protective equipment.

(5) If a worker has symptoms of musculoskeletal injury, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) advise the worker to consult a physician or a health care professional who is registered or licensed pursuant to an Act to practise any of the healing arts; and

(b) promptly review the activities of that worker and of other workers doing similar tasks to identify any cause of the symptoms and to take corrective measures to avoid further injuries.

Exposure control plan
Section 6-22 Exposure control plan

6‑22(1). In this section:

"engineering controls" means physical controls or barriers that isolate or remove an infectious disease hazard and includes:

(a) medical devices approved by Health Canada that have engineered sharps injury protections;

(b) sharps disposal containers;

(c) needleless systems and needles with engineered sharps injury protections as defined in section 31‑9; and

(d) other devices that isolate or remove sharps hazards;

"expose" means harmful contact with an infectious material or organism from inhalation, ingestion, skin or mucous membrane contact or percutaneous injury;

"exposure control plan" means an exposure control plan required pursuant to subsection (2);

"infectious material or organism" means an infectious material or organism that has been identified in an approved manner as an infectious disease hazard that poses a significantly increased exposure risk to a worker or self‑employed person.

(2) If workers are required to handle, use or produce an infectious material or organism or are likely to be exposed at a place of employment, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop and implement an exposure control plan to eliminate or minimize worker exposure.

(3) An exposure control plan must:

(a) be in writing;

(b) identify any workers at the place of employment who may be exposed;

(c) identify categories of tasks and procedures that may put workers at risk of exposure;

(d) describe the ways in which an infectious material or organism can enter the body of a worker and the risks associated with that entry;

(e) describe the signs and symptoms of any disease that may arise for a worker exposed at the place of employment;

(f) describe infection control measures to be used, such as the following:

(i) vaccination;

(ii) engineering controls;

(iii) personal protective equipment;

(iv) safe work practices and procedures; and

(v) standard practices that incorporate universal precautions;

(g) identify the limitations of the infection control measures described pursuant to clause (f);

(h) set out procedures to be followed in each of the following circumstances:

(i) if there has been a spill or leak of an infectious material or organism;

(ii) if a worker has been exposed;

(iii) if a worker believes that the worker has been exposed;

(i) set out the methods of cleaning, disinfecting or disposing of clothing, personal protective equipment or other equipment contaminated with an infectious material or organism that must be followed and indicate who is responsible for carrying out those activities;

(j) describe the training to be provided to workers who may be exposed and the means by which this training will be provided;

(k) require the investigation and documentation, in a manner that protects the confidentiality of the exposed worker, of any work‑related exposure incident, including the route of exposure and the circumstances in which the exposure occurred; and

(l) require the investigation of any occurrence of an occupationally transmitted infection or infectious disease to identify the route of exposure and implement measures to prevent further infection.

(4) If subsection (2) applies to an employer, that employer must describe in the employer’s exposure control plan the steps that will be taken to ensure compliance with this section and, if applicable, subsection 31‑9(3).

(5) No employer shall allow a worker to undertake any tasks or procedures mentioned in clause (3) (c) unless the worker has been trained with respect to the exposure control plan and the use of control measures appropriate for the task or procedure undertaken.

(6) An employer, in consultation with the committee, shall review the adequacy of the exposure control plan, and amend the plan if necessary, at least every 2 years or as necessary to reflect advances in infection control measures, including engineering controls.

(7) An employer shall make a copy of the exposure control plan and any amendments to that plan readily available to every worker who may be exposed.

(8) An employer shall:

(a) inform workers who are required to handle, use or produce an infectious material or organism or who may be exposed at a place of employment of the following:

(i) any vaccine recommended for workers with respect to that risk in the Canadian Immunization Guide, published by the Public Health Agency of Canada , and recommended by:

(A) a medical health officer appointed pursuant to The Public Health Act or a designated public health officer within the meaning of The Public Health Act, 1994whose powers and responsibilities include those set out in Part IV of The Public Health Act, 1994; or

(B) a physician with expertise in immunization or the control of communicable diseases;

(ii) the risks associated with taking a vaccine mentioned in subclause (i);

(b) with the worker’s consent, arrange for the worker to receive any vaccination recommended pursuant to subclause (a) (i) during the worker’s normal working hours and reimburse the worker for any costs associated with receiving the vaccination; and

(c) if a worker cannot receive a vaccination mentioned in subclause (a) (i) during the worker’s normal working hours, credit the worker’s attendance for the vaccination as time at work and ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits.

(9) If a worker has been exposed to blood or potentially infectious bodily fluids at a place of employment, an employer shall, with the consent of the worker, during the worker’s normal working hours, arrange for immediate medical evaluation and intervention by a qualified person in an approved manner and for confidential post‑exposure counselling.

(10) If a worker cannot receive medical evaluation, medical intervention or post‑exposure counselling during the worker’s normal working hours, an employer shall credit the worker’s attendance for evaluation, intervention or counselling as time at work and shall ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits.

(11) Nothing in these regulations prohibits an employer or contractor from purchasing supplies in bulk together with another employer or contractor but each employer or contractor is responsible for ensuring the employer or contractor’s compliance with these regulations.

PART 7

Personal Protective Equipment

Working in dangerous atmospheres
Section 7-5 Working in dangerous atmospheres

7‑5(1). If a worker is required to enter an atmosphere that is immediately dangerous to the life or health of the worker, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker is provided with and uses an approved atmosphere‑supplying respirator that is:

(a) an open‑circuit SCBA that:

(i) operates in a pressure demand or other positive pressure mode;

(ii) has a minimum rated capacity of 30 minutes;

(iii) is sufficiently charged to enable the worker to perform the work safely; and

(iv) is equipped with a low‑pressure warning device or an escape respirator;

(b) an airline respirator equipped with a full facepiece that:

(i) operates in a pressure demand or other positive pressure mode; and

(ii) has an auxiliary supply of air sufficient to allow the worker to escape in case of failure of the primary air supply equipment; or

(c) a closed‑circuit SCBA.

(2) If a worker is required to enter an atmosphere that is immediately dangerous to life or health, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a second worker, suitably equipped and trained, is present and in communication with the worker at all times; and

(b) suitably equipped personnel who are trained in rescue procedures and are fully informed of the hazards are readily available to rescue the endangered worker immediately if the worker’s atmosphere‑supplying respirator fails or the worker becomes incapacitated for any other reason.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that compressed air in an atmosphere‑supplying respirator used by a worker in an atmosphere that is immediately dangerous to the worker’s life or health meets the purity requirements set out in Table 2 of the Canadian Standards Association standard CAN Z180.1‑M85 Compressed Breathing Air and Systems.

Skin protection
Section 7-9 Skin protection

7‑9(1). If there is a risk of injury to the skin of a worker from sparks, molten metal or radiation, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved protective clothing or covers or any other safeguard that provides equivalent protection for the worker.

(2) If there is a risk of injury to the skin of a worker from fire or explosion, an employer or contractor shall provide the worker with, and require the worker to use, outer fire resistant clothing that:

(a) meets an approved industry standard; and

(b) is appropriate to the risk.

(3) If there is a risk of injury to the skin of an electrical worker from arc flash, an employer or contractor shall provide the electrical worker with, and require the electrical worker to use, arc flash protection that meets an approved standard.

Protection against drowning
Section 7-22 Protection against drowning

7‑22(1). In this section:

"buoyant apparatus" means a device that is capable of supporting the weight in water of a worker and that is constructed to:

(a) remain stable when floating on either side;

(b) have no projections that would prevent the buoyant apparatus from sliding easily over the side of a boat or ship; and

(c) require no adjustment before use;

"life jacket" means an approved device that is capable of keeping a worker’s head above water in a face‑up position without effort by the worker;

"personal flotation device" means an approved device that is capable of keeping a worker’s head above water without effort by the worker, and includes a device that is designed to protect a worker against hypothermia.

(2) If a worker is required to work at a place from which the worker could fall and drown, and the worker is not protected by a guardrail, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide the worker with a life jacket and ensure that the worker uses it, and ensure that the rescue equipment and personnel described in subsection (3) are readily available;

(b) provide the worker with a full‑body harness and lifeline and ensure that the worker uses them; or

(c) ensure that a net is installed that is capable of safely catching the worker if the worker falls.

(3) The rescue equipment and personnel required by clause (2) (a) must consist of:

(a) a suitable boat equipped with a boat hook;

(b) a buoyant apparatus attached to a nylon rope that is not less than nine millimetres in diameter and not less than 15 metres long; and

(c) a sufficient number of properly equipped and trained workers to implement rescue procedures.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a life jacket or personal flotation device is provided for each worker who is transported by boat or works from a boat, and that each worker uses the life jacket or personal flotation device at all times when the worker is in the boat.

PART 9

Safeguards, Storage, Warning Signs and Signals

Fall protection plan
Section 9-3 Fall protection plan

9‑3(1). An employer or contractor shall develop a written fall protection plan if:

(a) a worker may fall 3 metres or more; and

(b) workers are not protected by a guardrail or similar barrier.

(2) The fall protection plan required by subsection (1) must describe:

(a) the fall hazards at the worksite;

(b) the fall protection system to be used at the worksite;

(c) the procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system; and

(d) the rescue procedures to be used if a worker falls, is suspended by a personal fall arrest system or safety net and needs to be rescued.

(3) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a copy of the fall protection plan is readily available before work begins at a worksite if a risk of falling exists.

(4) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker is trained in the fall protection plan and the safe use of the fall protection system before allowing the worker to work in an area where a fall protection system must be used.

PART 15

Robotics

Definitions for Part
Section 15-1 Definitions for Part

15‑1. In this Part:

"emergency stop" means a circuit that uses hardware‑based components to override all other robot controls, shut off energy to a robot and stop all moving parts of a robot;

"end‑effector" means an accessory device or tool specifically designed to be attached to a robot wrist or tool‑mounting plate to enable the robot to perform the robot’s intended task;

"interlock" means an arrangement whereby the operation of 1 control or mechanism brings about, or prevents, the operation of another control or mechanism;

"interlock barrier" means a physical barrier around a work envelope that is equipped with gates and interlocks designed to stop all automatic operations of a robot and robot system when any gate within the barrier is opened;

"limiting device" means a device that restricts the distance a robot can travel after the limiting device is actuated;

"pendant" means a portable control device that permits an operator to control a robot from within the work envelope of the robot;

"presence‑sensing device" means a device that is designed, constructed and installed to create a sensing field or area and that detects an intrusion into the field or area by workers, robots or other objects and stops all motion of the robot when the presence‑sensing device is activated;

"restricted work envelope" means the portion of a work envelope to which a robot is restricted by limiting devices that establish limits that cannot be exceeded if the robot or the robot’s controls fail;

"robot" means a reprogrammable multi‑functional manipulator designed to move material, parts, tools or specialized devices through variable programmed motions to perform a variety of tasks;

"robot system" means a robot and all the accessories required for the robot’s operation, including end‑effectors, pendants, devices, sensors, safeguards, power and control panels and communication interfaces to sequence and monitor the robot;

"slow speed" means a mode of operation in which the speed of any part of a robot does not exceed 250 millimetres per second;

"teach" means to generate and store a series of positional datapoints by moving a robot arm through a path of intended motions;

"work envelope" means the volume of space enclosing the maximum designed reach of a robot, including the end‑effector, and the material, part, tool or specialized device that the robot is designed to manipulate.

Controls
Section 15-6 Controls

15‑6(1). Subject to subsection (2), an employer shall ensure that a robot’s primary controls, including a restart control:

(a) are located outside the restricted work envelope;

(b) are arranged so that the robot and robot system are clearly visible to the worker who operates the primary controls; and

(c) cannot be activated inadvertently.

(2) If a worker is required or permitted to enter the restricted work envelope, an employer shall ensure that the robot’s motion cannot be initiated by any person other than the worker within the restricted work envelope using a pendant.

(3) An employer shall ensure that a worker who operates a robot or robot system is provided with a readily accessible emergency stop device.

(4) An employer shall ensure that the controls of a robot provide a slow speed option.

PART 16

Entrances, Exits and Ladders

General duty re entrances, exits
Section 16-1 General duty re entrances, exits

16‑1. An employer, contractor or owner shall provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from a place of employment and all worksites and work‑related areas in or on a place of employment.

Doors
Section 16-2 Doors

16‑2. An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) every door in a hazardous work area opens away from the hazard and is not blocked by an obstruction; and

(b) every walk‑in freezer or refrigerator is equipped with a means to open the door from the inside.

PART 17

Excavations, Trenches, Tunnels and Excavated Shafts

Locating underground pipelines, etc.
Section 17-3 Locating underground pipelines, etc.

17‑3(1). An employer or contractor shall accurately establish the location of all underground pipelines, cables and conduits in an area where work is to be done and shall ensure that those locations are conspicuously marked:

(a) before commencing work using power tools or powered mobile equipment on an excavation, trench, tunnel, excavated shaft or borehole; or

(b) before breaking ground surface with any equipment to a depth that may contact underground utilities.

(2) If an operation is to be undertaken involving the disturbance of soil within 600 millimetres of an existing pipeline, cable or conduit, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the pipeline, cable or conduit is exposed by hand digging or other approved method before mechanical excavating is allowed to begin within that area.

(3) If an operation mentioned in subsection (2) exposes a pipeline, cable or conduit, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the pipeline, cable or conduit is supported to prevent any damage during backfilling and any subsequent settlement of the ground.

(4) If there is contact with or damage to an underground pipeline, cable or conduit, an employer or contractor shall immediately:

(a) notify the owner of the pipeline, cable or conduit that contact or damage has occurred; and

(b) take steps to protect the health and safety of any worker who may be at risk until any unsafe condition resulting from the contact or damage is repaired or corrected.

Protection against cave-in of trenches
Section 17-7 Protection against cave‑in of trenches

17‑7(1) If a worker is present in a trench that is more than 1.2 metres deep, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker is protected from cave‑ins or sliding material by:

(a) cutting back the upper portion of the walls of the trench in accordance with subsection 17‑4(2);

(b) installing a temporary protective structure; or

(c) a combination of cutting back the walls to the slope specified in subsection 17‑4(2) and installing a temporary protective structure that extends at least 300 millimetres above the base of the cut‑back.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a temporary protective structure required by clause (1) (b) or (c) is:

(a) designed and installed using shoring made of number 1 structural grade spruce lumber having the dimensions set out in Table 14 of the Appendix for the type of soil and the depth of the trench or made of material of equivalent or greater strength; or

(b) designed by a professional engineer and constructed, installed, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with that design.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a temporary protective structure in a trench more than 6 metres deep in type 1, type 2 or type 3 soil or in a trench more than 4 metres deep in type 4 soil is designed and certified as safe by a professional engineer and installed, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with that design.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) shoring is installed and removed in a manner that protects workers from cave‑ins and structural collapses and from being struck by shoring components;

(b) shoring components are securely connected together to prevent sliding, falling, kickouts or other possible failure; and

(c) individual components of shoring are not subjected to loads that exceed the loads the components were designed to bear.

(5) If a worker is in a trench that is more than 1.2 metres deep, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a competent worker is stationed on the surface to alert the worker in the trench about the development of any potentially unsafe conditions and to provide assistance in an emergency.

(6) If a worker is required to enter a trench, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) install ladders, stairways or ramps to provide a safe means of entrance to and exit from the trench; and

(b) ensure that the ladder, stairway or ramp is located not more than 8 metres from a worker working in the trench.

(7) An employer or contractor shall ensure that workers are instructed in and comply with the requirements of this section.

PART 18

Confined Space Entry

Definitions for Part
Section 18-1 Definitions for Part

18‑1. In this Part:

"confined space" means an enclosed or partially enclosed space that:

(a) is not primarily designed or intended for human occupancy, except for the purpose of performing work; and

(b) has restricted means of entrance and exit;

"hazardous confined space" means a confined space that is or may become hazardous to a worker entering the confined space due to:

(a) the design, construction or atmosphere of the confined space;

(b) the materials or substances in the confined space;

(c) the work activities or processes used in the confined space; or

(d) any other conditions relating to the confined space;

"isolate" means to physically interrupt or disconnect pipes, lines and sources of energy from a confined space.

Entry plan
Section 18-7 Entry plan

18‑7(1). If a worker will be required or permitted to enter a hazardous confined space, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop a hazardous confined space entry plan to ensure the health and safety of workers who enter or work in the hazardous confined space.

(2) A hazardous confined space entry plan must be in writing and must include:

(a) the tests or measurements necessary to monitor any oxygen deficiency or enrichment or the presence and hazardous concentration of flammable or explosive substances;

(b) the identification of any other hazards that may be present in the hazardous confined space and may put the health or safety of workers at risk;

(c) the means, if any, of isolating the hazardous confined space;

(d) the means, if any, of ventilating the hazardous confined space;

(e) the procedures to enter, work in and exit from the hazardous confined space safely;

(f) the availability, location and proper use of personal protective equipment;

(g) the rescue procedures to be followed, including the number and duties of personnel and the availability, location and proper use of equipment;

(h) the means to maintain effective communication with a worker who has entered the hazardous confined space; and

(i) the availability, location and proper use of any other equipment that a worker may need to work safely in the hazardous confined space.

(3) An employer shall ensure that the following workers are trained in and implement a hazardous confined space entry plan:

(a) a worker who is required or permitted to enter the hazardous confined space;

(b) a worker who attends a worker in the hazardous confined space pursuant to subsection 18‑9(4) or (5);

(c) a worker who may be required or permitted to implement the rescue procedures mentioned in clause (2) (g).

(4) An employer shall make a copy of a hazardous confined space entry plan readily available at the entrance to the hazardous confined space.

Precautions if safe atmosphere not possible
Section 18-9 Precautions if safe atmosphere not possible

18‑9(1). If a hazardous confined space cannot be purged and ventilated to provide a safe atmosphere or a safe atmosphere cannot be maintained pursuant to section 18‑8, an employer shall ensure that no work is carried on in the confined space except in accordance with the requirements of this section and section 25‑11.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a competent person continuously monitors the atmosphere in a hazardous confined space.

(3) An employer shall ensure that a worker is provided with and required to use a respiratory protective device that meets the requirements of Part 7 if:

(a) the airborne concentration for any substance meets or exceeds the permissible contamination limit mentioned in clause 21‑6(1) (a);

(b) oxygen deficiency or enrichment is detected; or

(c) the airborne concentration of any other substance may be harmful to the worker.

(4) An employer shall ensure that a worker in a hazardous confined space is attended by and in communication with another worker who:

(a) has been adequately trained in the rescue procedures mentioned in clause 18‑7(2) (g);

(b) is stationed and remains at the entrance to the confined space unless replaced by another adequately trained worker; and

(c) is equipped with a suitable alarm to summon assistance.

(5) If entrance to a hazardous confined space is from the top:

(a) an employer shall ensure that:

(i) a worker uses a full‑body harness and, if appropriate, is attached to a lifeline;

(ii) if a lifeline is used, the lifeline is attended by another worker who is adequately trained in the rescue procedures mentioned in clause 18‑7(2) (g); and

(iii) if reasonably practicable, a mechanical lifting device is available to assist with a rescue and is located at the entry to the confined space while a worker is in the confined space; or

(b) an employer shall ensure that an alternate method of rescue is developed and implemented if the use of a full‑body harness or lifeline would create an additional hazard.

(6) If any flammable or explosive dusts, gases, vapours or liquids are or may be present in a hazardous confined space, an employer shall ensure that all sources of ignition are eliminated or controlled.

(7) An employer shall ensure that:

(a) equipment necessary to rescue workers is readily available at the entrance to the hazardous confined space and used in accordance with the rescue procedures developed pursuant to clause 18‑7(2) (g);

(b) the holder of a class A qualification in first aid is available to provide immediate first aid; and

(c) personnel who are trained in the rescue procedures developed pursuant to clause 18‑7(2) (g) and who are fully informed of the hazards in the confined space are readily available to assist in a rescue procedure.

PART 19

Work in Compressed Air

Definitions for Part
Section 19-1 Definitions for Part

19‑1. In this Part:

"air lock" means a chamber designed for the passage of persons or materials from one place to a place with a different air pressure;

"compressed air" means air that is mechanically raised to a pressure higher than 15 kilopascals above atmospheric pressure;

"medical lock" means a chamber in which persons may be subjected to changes in air pressure for medical purposes;

"working chamber" means the part of a project under construction that is used for work in compressed air, but does not include an air lock or medical lock.

Application of Part
Section 19-2 Application of Part

19‑2. This Part applies to work performed in compressed air, but does not apply to divers or persons working in diving bells.

Before work in compressed air begins

Section 19-3 Before work in compressed air begins

19‑3(1). At least 30 days before beginning work in compressed air, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) give notice in writing to the ministry of the nature and location of the work; and

(b) provide the ministry with copies of the certificates of a professional engineer who is competent in construction work carried out in compressed air and a physician who is competent in hyperbaric medicine.

(2) The certificates required by subsection (1) must:

(a) certify that the design of the compressed air installation and its components, including any air lock, medical lock, bulkhead, door and working chamber, the air supply system, the control system and the emergency facilities, are suitable and adequate to provide a healthy and safe work environment; and

(b) contain a statement of conditions and procedures that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of workers employed in the compressed air installation.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that any work in a compressed air installation is performed in accordance with the conditions and procedures contained in the certificates required by subsection (1).

Workers in working chamber

Section 19-4 Workers in working chamber

19‑4(1). If workers are employed in a working chamber, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) emergency procedures, including decompression procedures, have been developed that are adequate to prevent worker ill health;

(b) the workers are fully trained in the emergency procedures required by clause (a);

(c) the workers are regularly monitored by a physician; and

(d) a competent supervisor is appointed and given the authority and resources necessary to protect the health and safety of workers in the working chamber.

(2) A worker who is monitored by a physician pursuant to clause (1) (c) shall comply with any requirement that the physician considers necessary to prevent or treat ill health caused by working in compressed air.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the emergency procedures required by clause (1) (a) are implemented in an emergency.

Maximum air pressure

Section 19-6 Maximum air pressure

19‑6.An employer or contractor shall ensure that the air pressure in a working chamber does not exceed 350 kilopascals for more than 5 minutes except when it is necessary for the safety of workers in an emergency.

PART 20

Diving Operations

Definitions for Part
Section 20-1 Definitions for Part

Definitions for Part

20‑1 In this Part:

"air" means respirable air;

"atmospheric pressure" means the atmospheric pressure at the surface of the water;

"bail‑out system" means an independent breathing gas supply of sufficient quantity to return a diver to the surface, to a diving bell or to an emergency supply in the event of a malfunction of the primary breathing gas supply system;

"bottom time" means the total elapsed time, measured in minutes, from the time a descending diver leaves the surface of the water to the time the diver begins final ascent;

"breathing gas" means air or mixed gas;

"buddy system" means the system described in section 20‑16;

"class A hyperbaric chamber" means a hyperbaric chamber that meets the requirements of Canadian Standards Association standard Z275.1‑93 Hyperbaric Facilities for a class A hyperbaric chamber;

"decompression limit" means the point in the descent of a diver, based on the depth and duration of the dive and determined in accordance with a decompression table, beyond which the diver will require 1 or more decompression stops during ascent if the diver descends further;

"decompression schedule" means the procedure derived from a decompression table that a diver follows during ascent from a depth in order to minimize the risk of decompression sickness;

"decompression sickness" means a condition caused by the formation of gas bubbles in the blood or body tissue as a result of the reduction of pressure on the body;

"decompression table" means a table mentioned in section 20‑3;

"dive site" means the location at the surface of the water at which a diver enters the water at the beginning of a dive and to which the diver intends to return on ascent;

"diver" means a competent worker or competent self‑employed person who performs underwater work;

"diver’s tender" means a worker who monitors the dive of a diver and who is competent in the diving apparatus being used for a dive, the diving operation in progress and the emergency diving procedures and signals to be used between diver and diver’s tender;

"diving supervisor" means a competent person who has complete responsibility for a diving operation, including responsibility for the health and safety of all diving personnel;

"dressed‑in" means fully equipped to dive and ready to enter the water, with all life support and communications equipment tested and at hand, but not necessarily with the helmet, face plate or face mask in place;

"free swimming diving" means diving while using scuba with the diver supervised but not tethered to the surface by a lifeline or float;

"hyperbaric chamber" means a pressure vessel and associated equipment that are designed for the purpose of subjecting persons to pressures greater than atmospheric pressures;

"lifeline" means a line of manila rope that is 19 millimetres in diameter and has a breaking strength of not less than 2454 kilograms, or material of equivalent or greater strength, secured at the surface to a substantial anchorage;

"mixed gas" means a respirable breathing mixture, other than air, that provides adequate oxygen to support life and does not cause excessive breathing resistance, impairment of neurological functions or other detrimental physiological effects;

"scuba" means a self‑contained underwater breathing apparatus, and includes self‑contained open‑circuit compressed air breathing apparatus;

"standby diver" means a diver who is:

(a) available at a dive site to give assistance to a submerged diver in the event of an emergency;

(b) dressed‑in; and

(c) trained and equipped to operate at the depths and in the circumstances in which the submerged diver is operating;

"surface supply diving" means a mode of diving in which a diver is supplied from the dive site with a breathing gas by way of an umbilical;

"therapeutic recompression" means treatment of a diver for decompression sickness, usually in a hyperbaric chamber, in accordance with section 20‑3;

"umbilical" means a life support hose bundle comprising a composite hose and cable, or separate hoses and cables, that:

(a) extends from the surface to a diver or to a submersible chamber occupied by a diver; and

(b) supplies breathing gas, power, heat and communication to the diver.

Standby diver
Section 20-7 Standby diver

20‑7(1). An employer shall ensure that a standby diver is present at all times when diving operations are in progress.

(2) An employer shall not require or permit a standby diver to dive except in the case of emergency.

Equipment for diving base
Section 20-11 Equipment for diving base

20‑11. While diving is in progress, an employer shall ensure that the diving base is equipped with the following:

(a) if scuba is being used, 1 complete spare set of underwater breathing apparatus with fully charged cylinders to be used for emergency purposes only;

(b) an adequate quantity of oxygen for therapeutic purposes;

(c) 1 shot‑line of weighted 19 millimetre manila of sufficient length to reach the bottom at the maximum depth of water at the dive site;

(d) a first aid kit that is appropriate for the number of workers and the worksite;

(e) 1 complete set of decompression tables;

(f) a suitable heated facility for the use of divers that is located on or as near as possible to the dive site;

(g) any other equipment that may be necessary to protect the health and safety of a worker.

Diving plan
Section 20-13 Diving plan

20‑13(1). A diving supervisor shall submit a general diving plan in writing to the employer before beginning a diving operation.

(2) A diving supervisor shall:

(a) plan the dive to ensure the health and safety of the diver;

(b) instruct the surface crew on the procedures necessary to ensure the health and safety of the diver;

(c) ensure that all necessary equipment is available and is in good operating condition;

(d) ensure that the quantity of breathing gas supplied to a diver is sufficient for the dive that is planned;

(e) develop and implement a contingency plan for any emergency situation that may endanger the diver;

(f) keep a log showing each diver’s activities on each day and make entries respecting each dive on the day on which the dive is performed;

(g) remain in the immediate area of the dive site at all times while a diving operation is in progress;

(h) ensure that each diver enters in the diver’s personal log the information required by clause 20‑15(2) (a) for each dive performed by the diver; and

(i) verify the accuracy of the information recorded in each diver’s personal log pursuant to clause 20‑15(2) (a) and sign the entry to acknowledge the supervisor’s verification.

(3) Nothing in this section limits the responsibilities of an employer pursuant to this Part

Buddy system
Section 20-16 Buddy system

20‑16(1). The buddy system of diving involves the use of 2 divers, each of whom is responsible for the other diver’s safety.

(2) A diver who is diving using the buddy system:

(a) shall maintain constant visual contact with the other buddy diver during the dive;

(b) shall know the hand signals being used and acknowledge each signal as given;

(c) shall not leave the other buddy diver except in the case of emergency requiring the assistance of 1 of the buddy divers; and

(d) shall abort the dive immediately if the buddy divers become separated from each other or the other buddy diver aborts the dive.

PART 21

Chemical and Biological Substances

Accumulations, spills and leaks
Section 21-9 Accumulations, spills and leaks

21‑9. If there is a possibility of an accumulation, spill or leak of a chemical substance or biological substance that may be hazardous to the health or safety of a worker at a place of employment, an employer:

(a) in consultation with the committee, shall develop written emergency procedures to be implemented in the event of an accumulation, spill or leak;

(b) shall make readily available for reference by workers a copy of the emergency procedures developed pursuant to clause (a);

(c) shall ensure that each worker is trained in and implements any of the emergency procedures developed pursuant to clause (a) that:

(i) require the involvement of the worker; or

(ii) are necessary to protect the health or safety of the worker;

(d) shall ensure that competent persons, equipment, supplies and personal protective equipment are available for the prompt, safe and effective containment, neutralizing and decontamination of any accumulation, spill or leak; and

(e) shall ensure that the emergency procedures developed pursuant to clause (a) are implemented in the event of an accumulation, spill or leak.

Report of worker's exposure
Section 21-10 Report of worker’s exposure

21‑10(1). If an accumulation, spill or leak of a chemical substance or biological substance listed in Table 16 or 17 of the Appendix occurs and results in the exposure of a worker to the chemical substance or biological substance to an extent that may affect the health or safety of the worker, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall investigate the incident as soon as is reasonably possible and prepare a written report that includes:

(a) a description of the incident, including the date and all affected worksites;

(b) the names of the substances released and the characteristics of the substances;

(c) for each substance released, the estimated duration and the extent of each worker’s exposure;

(d) the name of each worker exposed and the manner in which the substance entered the worker’s body;

(e) the causes of the incident; and

(f) any corrective actions taken to prevent occurrence of a similar incident.

(2) An employer shall provide a copy of a report prepared pursuant to subsection (1) to any worker who was exposed to the chemical substance or biological substance that was released.

Emergency showers
Section 21-11 Emergency showers

21‑11. If there may be a risk of substantial contamination of a worker or of a worker’s clothing from corrosive or other harmful substances, an employer or contractor shall provide and maintain an approved and readily accessible means of bathing or showering the worker in lukewarm water.

Eye flushing equipment
Section 21-12 Eye flushing equipment

21‑12. If there may be a risk to the eyes of a worker from corrosive or other harmful substances, an employer or contractor shall provide, at readily accessible locations, approved equipment to flush the eyes of the worker with lukewarm water or another appropriate liquid.

PART 23

Asbestos

Definitions for Part
Section 23-1 Definitions for Part

23‑1. In this Part:

"asbestos" means the fibrous form of crocidolite, amosite, chrysotile, anthophyllite, actinolite, tremolite or a mixture containing any of those minerals;

"asbestos dust" means dust that consists of or contains asbestos fibres that are likely to become airborne;

"asbestos‑containing material" means:

(a) vermiculite determined to contain any asbestos when tested according to an approved method; or

(b) any material, other than vermiculite, that when tested according to an approved method is determined to contain:

(i) a proportion of asbestos greater than 0.5%, if the material is friable; or

(ii) a proportion of asbestos greater than 1.0%, if the material is non‑friable;

"asbestos process" means any activity that may release asbestos dust, and includes:

(a) the sawing, cutting or sanding of asbestos‑containing materials;

(b) the repair, maintenance, replacement or removal of asbestos surfaces;

(c) the cleaning or disposal of asbestos materials;

(d) the mixing or application of asbestos shorts, cements, grouts, putties or similar compounds;

(e) the storing or conveyance of materials containing asbestos; and

(f) the demolition of structures containing asbestos;

"asbestos surface" means the surface of an object that contains asbestos;

"friable" means material that, when dry, is or can be crumbled, pulverized or powdered by hand pressure.

Asbestos processes
Section 23-8 Asbestos processes

23‑8(1) An employer or contractor shall:

(a) ensure that every asbestos process is carried out in a manner that prevents, to the extent that is practicable, the release into the air of asbestos dust;

(b) in consultation with the committee, develop an asbestos control plan that protects the health and safety of all workers in the event of the dispersal of asbestos dust into the atmosphere at a place of employment or worksite; and

(c) implement the asbestos control plan developed pursuant to clause (b).

(2) A plan developed pursuant to subsection (1) must be in writing and must include:

(a) the emergency procedures to be used in case of an uncontrolled release of asbestos, including:

(i) the means to protect exposed workers;

(ii) the methods to confine and control the release of asbestos; and

(iii) the decontamination procedures to be used;

(b) the asbestos processes that workers may undertake;

(c) the training of workers in any asbestos process the workers may be required or permitted to undertake;

(d) the methods to control the release of asbestos dust;

(e) the personal protective equipment that workers may be required to use;

(f) the decontamination procedures for:

(i) the worksite; and

(ii) the workers who undertake any asbestos process; and

(g) the inspection and maintenance schedule for all asbestos‑containing materials.

(3) An employer or contractor shall make a copy of the plan developed pursuant to subsection (1) readily available for reference by workers.

(4) If an asbestos process is undertaken, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the area is effectively isolated or otherwise enclosed to prevent the escape of asbestos dust to any other part of the place of employment;

(b) a warning notice is conspicuously displayed indicating that asbestos work is in progress;

(c) all asbestos‑containing materials removed are placed in appropriate receptacles that are impervious to asbestos and that are clearly labelled "Asbestos"; and

(d) the receptacles mentioned in clause (c) are handled and transported in a manner that will protect them from physical damage.

PART 25

Fire and Explosion Hazards

Definitions for Part
Section 25-1 Definitions for Part

25‑1. In this Part:

"combustible liquid" means a liquid that has a flashpoint at or above 37.8° Celsius and below 93.3° Celsius;

"container" means a stationary or portable vessel that is used to contain a flammable substance, and includes a tank, tank car, tank truck and a cylinder;

"flammable liquid" means a liquid that has a flashpoint below 37.8° Celsius and has a vapour pressure not exceeding 275.8 kilopascals at 37.8° Celsius;

"flammable substance" means:

(a) a flammable or combustible solid, liquid or gas; or

(b) dust that is capable of creating an explosive atmosphere when suspended in air in concentrations within the explosive limit of the dust;

"hot work" means work that produces arcs, sparks, flames, heat or other sources of ignition;

"system" means a system into which compressed or liquified gases are delivered and stored and from which the compressed or liquified gas is discharged in the liquid or gaseous form, and includes containers, pressure regulators, pressure relief devices, manifolds, interconnecting piping and controls.

Fire safety plan
Section 25-2 Fire safety plan

25‑2(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall:

(a) take all reasonably practicable steps to prevent the outbreak of fire at a place of employment and to provide effective means to protect workers from any fire that may occur; and

(b) develop and implement a written fire safety plan that provides for the safety of all workers in the event of a fire.

(2) A plan developed pursuant to subsection (1) must include:

(a) the emergency procedures to be used in case of fire, including:

(i) sounding the fire alarm;

(ii) notifying the fire department; and

(iii) evacuating endangered workers, with special provisions for workers with disabilities;

(b) the quantities, locations and storage methods of all flammable substances present at the place of employment;

(c) the designation of persons to carry out the fire safety plan and the duties of the designated persons;

(d) the training of designated persons and workers in their responsibilities for fire safety;

(e) the holding of fire drills; and

(f) the control of fire hazards.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) designated persons and workers who have been assigned fire safety duties are adequately trained in, and implement, the fire safety plan;

(b) the fire safety plan is posted in a conspicuous place for reference by workers; and

(c) a fire drill is held at least once during each 12‑month period.

Fire extinguishers
Section 25-3 Fire extinguishers

25‑3(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that portable fire extinguishers are selected, located, inspected, maintained and tested so that the health and safety of workers at the place of employment is protected. (

2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that portable fire extinguishers are placed not more than 9 metres away from:

(a) each industrial open‑flame portable heating device, tar pot or asphalt kettle that is in use; and

(b) each welding or cutting operation that is in progress.

Garbage as fire hazard
Section 25-4 Garbage as fire hazard

25‑4. If garbage that may constitute a fire hazard is present at a place of employment, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide covered receptacles for the garbage that are suitable to the nature of the hazard.

Procedures for flammable substances
Section 25-5 Procedures for flammable substances

25‑5(1). If a flammable substance is or is intended to be handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at a place of employment, an employer, contractor or owner shall develop written procedures to ensure the health and safety of workers who:

(a) handle, use, store, produce or dispose of a flammable substance that may spontaneously ignite or ignite when in combination with any other substance; or

(b) perform hot work where there is a risk of fire.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that all workers who are required or permitted to perform work mentioned in subsection (1) are trained in, and implement, the procedures developed pursuant to subsection (1).

(3) Workers who perform work mentioned in subsection (1) shall implement the procedures developed pursuant to subsection (1).

Receptables for materials contaminated by flammable liquids
Section 25-6 Receptacles for materials contaminated by flammable liquids

25‑6(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that materials contaminated by flammable liquids are placed in receptacles that:

(a) are non‑combustible and have close‑fitting metal covers;

(b) are labelled "flammable"; and

(c) are located at least 1 metre away from other flammable liquids.

(2) If the surface on which a receptacle required by subsection (1) is placed is combustible, an employer shall ensure that the receptacle has a flanged bottom or legs that are not less than 50 millimetres high.

(3) A worker shall place materials contaminated by flammable liquids and garbage that may constitute a fire hazard into the appropriate receptacle required by this section or by section 25‑4.

Receptacles for combustible or flammable liquids
Section 25-7 Receptacles for combustible or flammable liquids

25‑7. An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that combustible and flammable liquids are kept in receptacles that meet the requirements set out in the National Fire Code of Canada 1990, including any revisions and errata published from time to time, respecting the storage of flammable and combustible liquids.

Hazardous activities involving combustible or flammable liquids
Section 25-8 Hazardous activities involving combustible or flammable liquids

25‑8(1). An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) no gasoline is used to start a fire or used as a cleaning agent; and

(b) no worker is required or permitted:

(i) to replenish a tank on a heating device with a combustible or flammable liquid while the device is in operation or is hot enough to ignite the liquid; or

(ii) to place a tar pot, while in use, within 3 metres of an entrance to or exit from a building.

(2) A worker shall not:

(a) use gasoline to start a fire or use gasoline as a cleaning agent; or

(b) replenish a tank on a heating device with a flammable or combustible liquid while the device is in operation or is hot enough to ignite the liquid.

Control of ignition sources, static charges
Section 25-9 Control of ignition sources, static charges

25‑9. An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) suitable procedures are developed and implemented to prevent the ignition of flammable liquids or explosive dusts that are present at a worksite;

(b) all sources or potential sources of ignition are eliminated or controlled where an explosive atmosphere exists or is likely to exist; and

(c) static charge accumulations during transfer of flammable liquids or explosive substances from one container to another are prevented by electrically bonding the containers.

Flammable liquids, gases or explosive substances in vehicles
Section 25-10 Flammable liquids, gases or explosive substances in vehicles

25‑10(1). An employer shall ensure that no worker undertakes any servicing or maintenance of a vehicle while a flammable liquid or gas or an explosive substance:

(a) is loaded into or unloaded from the vehicle; or

(b) is present in the vehicle in any place other than the fuel tank.

(2) If reasonably practicable, a worker who operates a vehicle that contains a flammable liquid or gas or an explosive substance shall ensure that the engine of the vehicle is shut off during the connection or disconnection of the lines for the loading or unloading of the flammable liquid, gas or explosive substance.

Flammable or explosive substance in atmosphere
Section 25-11 Flammable or explosive substance in atmosphere

25‑11(1). If a flammable or explosive substance is present in the atmosphere of a worksite at a level that is more than 20% of the lower explosive limit of that substance, an employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to enter or work at the worksite.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to:

(a) a firefighter who has been trained pursuant to section 32‑4; or

(b) a competent worker who meets the requirements of subsection (3) and who is acting in an emergency situation at the place of employment.

(3) An employer shall ensure that:

(a) the competent worker mentioned in clause (2) (b) is trained, equipped and works according to an approved standard;

(b) the training required by clause (a) is provided by a competent person; and

(c) a written record is kept of all training delivered to a worker pursuant to clause (a).

Hot work
Section 25-12 Hot work

25‑12(1). If a flammable substance is or may be present, an employer or contractor shall ensure that no hot work is performed until:

(a) suitable tests have been conducted that:

(i) indicate whether the atmosphere contains a flammable substance in a quantity sufficient to create an explosive atmosphere; and

(ii) confirm that the work may be safely performed; and

(b) the work procedures developed pursuant to clause 25‑5(1) (b) have been implemented to ensure continuous safe performance of the work.

(2) While hot work is being performed, an employer or contractor shall conduct tests described in clause (1) (a) at intervals appropriate to the work being performed and record the results.

(3) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit any hot work to be performed in the vicinity of a material that may constitute a fire hazard until suitable steps have been taken to reduce the risk of fire.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a container or piping that contains or has contained a flammable substance is purged using an effective method to remove the flammable substance from the container or piping before any hot work is begun on that container or piping.

(5) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit any welding or cutting of metal that has been cleaned with a flammable or combustible liquid until the metal has thoroughly dried.

Compressed and liquified gas systems
Section 25-13 Compressed and liquified gas systems

25‑13(1). An employer or contractor shall:

(a) develop and implement written procedures for the safe installation, use and maintenance of a system;

(b) make readily available for reference by workers the procedures developed pursuant to clause (a) before requiring or permitting the use of the system; and

(c) ensure that all workers are trained in and implement the procedures developed pursuant to clause (a).

(2) The workers shall implement the procedures developed pursuant to clause (1) (a).

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure:

(a) that a system:

(i) is not exposed to temperatures that may result in the failure of the system or explosion of the contents of the system;

(ii) is maintained in a clean state, free from oil, grease or other contaminant that may cause a failure of the system or that may burn or explode if the contaminant comes into contact with the contents of the system; and

(iii) is located, guarded and handled during filling, transportation, use and storage so that the system is protected from damage;

(b) that service valve outlets and the extensions of service valve outlets of containers that are not connected to any apparatus are capped; and

(c) if equipment is designed for use with a particular compressed or liquified gas or gases, that:

(i) only those gases are used in the equipment; and

(ii) the equipment is clearly labelled as being only for that use.

(4) A worker shall:

(a) take all reasonable steps to ensure that sparks, flames or other sources of ignition do not come into contact with a system;

(b) maintain a system in a clean state, free from oil, grease or any other contaminant; and

(c) secure the cap in place before transporting a container.

Oxygen
Section 25-14 Oxygen

25‑14(1). An employer or contractor shall ensure that no oil, grease or other contaminant contacts a cylinder, valve, regulator or any other fitting of an oxygen‑using apparatus or an oxygen distribution or generating system.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that oxygen is not used as a substitute for compressed air:

(a) in pneumatic tools;

(b) to create pressure;

(c) for ventilating purposes; or

(d) to blow out a pipeline.

(3) A worker shall not use oxygen as a substitute for compressed air:

(a) in pneumatic tools;

(b) to create pressure;

(c) for ventilating purposes; or

(d) to blow out a pipeline.

Gas burning and welding equipment
Section 25-15 Gas burning and welding equipment

25‑15(1). If gas burning or welding equipment is in use, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) approved flashback devices are installed on both hoses at the regulator end; and

(b) acetylene and liquified gas containers are used and stored in an upright position.

(2) A worker shall shut off the container valve and release the pressure in the hose when the worker has finished with any gas burning or welding equipment and is not likely to use it within the next 2 hours.

Piping
Section 25-16 Piping

25‑16(1). If workers are required or permitted to work on piping that may contain harmful substances or substances under pressure, an employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall develop written procedures to protect the workers from contact with those substances.

(2) The procedures developed pursuant to subsection (1) must include:

(a) the installation of a blank that is appropriate for the proper pressure in the piping;

(b) the closing of 2 blocking valves installed in the piping and the opening of a bleed‑off valve installed between the blocking valves;

(c) the installation of an approved safety device; or

(d) if the procedures mentioned in clauses (a), (b) and (c) are not reasonably practicable, any other procedures that are adequate to protect the health and safety of the workers.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that all workers are trained in and implement the procedures developed pursuant to subsection (1).

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the piping mentioned in clause (2) (a) is clearly marked to indicate that a blank has been installed; or

(b) the 2 blocking valves mentioned in clause (2) (b) or the approved safety device mentioned in clause (2) (c):

(i) are locked in the closed position and the bleed‑off valve is locked in the open position; and

(ii) are tagged to indicate that the valves must not be activated until the tags are removed by a worker designated by the employer for that purpose.

(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker designated pursuant to subclause (4) (b) (ii):

(a) monitors the valves to ensure that they are not activated while a worker is working on the piping; and

(b) records on the tag mentioned in subclause (4) (b) (ii) the date and time of each monitoring and signs the tag each time the worker monitors the valves.

(6) An employer or contractor shall ensure that any valve installed on piping mentioned in this section is clearly marked to indicate the open and closed positions.

PART 26

Explosives

Application of Part
Section 26-1 Application of Part

26‑1. This Part applies to all blasting activities except blasting activities governed by The Mines Regulations.

Qualifications of workers
Section 26-2 Qualifications of workers

26‑2(1). An employer or contractor who plans to conduct blasting activities shall ensure that a worker who is to undertake a blasting operation:

(a) has been thoroughly trained in:

(i) the estimation of the amount of explosives required, and in placing, priming and initiating the charge;

(ii) the appropriate procedures to be followed to ensure the safety of other workers;

(iii) the procedures to be followed in the event of a misfire; and

(iv) the examination of the site after blasting to ensure that it is safe to return to the site;

(b) has demonstrated competence to carry out the procedures mentioned in clause (a);

(c) has a thorough knowledge of all federal and provincial statutes, regulations and codes of practice pertaining to the safe use of explosives that are relevant to the blasting operation in question; and

(d) holds a written authorization to blast signed by the worker’s employer.

(2) A worker shall not undertake a blasting activity until the worker possesses written authorization to blast signed by the worker’s employer.

PART 28

Forestry and Mill Operations

Definitions for Part
Section 28-1 Definitions for Part

28‑1 In this Part:

"bucking" means sawing a log or felled tree into smaller lengths;

"chicot" means a dead or damaged tree or a dead or damaged limb of a tree;

"cutting" includes felling, limbing and bucking;

"felling" means cutting a tree from the tree’s stump and bringing the tree to the ground;

"forestry operation" means the cutting or harvesting of trees, and includes the transporting of logs and the preparing of sites for tree planting and seeding;

"limbing" means removing limbs from a tree that has been felled;

"lodged tree" means a tree that has not fallen to the ground after being partly or wholly separated from the tree’s stump or displaced from the tree’s natural position;

"mill operation" means the operation of a pulp mill, paper mill, sawmill, plywood mill, wafer‑board mill or strand‑board mill, and includes the operation of equipment that is designed to manufacture or process wood products;

"skidder operator" means a worker who operates a skidder or who operates any other powered mobile equipment to perform the work of a skidder;

"skidding" means moving logs or trees by pulling the logs or trees across the terrain;

"snag" means any material or object that may interfere with the safe movement of a tree or log or that may endanger a worker;

"stake" means a wooden or metal post or a post made of other material of equivalent strength that is used to support and prevent the lateral movement of logs;

"windfall" means a tree blown down by wind;

"wood products" includes pulp, pulpwood, paper, veneer, plywood, lumber, timber, poles, posts, chips, wafers and other products resulting from a forestry operation.

First aid attendant
Section 28-3 First aid attendant

28‑3. Notwithstanding section 5‑3, if a worker is cutting or skidding, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a first aid attendant with a class A qualification is readily available at all times.

PART 29

Oil and Gas

Definitions for Part
Section 29-1 Definitions for Part

29‑1. In this Part:

"derrick" means a stationary or portable structure that is used to support the hoisting and lowering mechanism on a rig;

"drilling rig" means the derrick and all equipment that is directly involved with drilling a well or producing oil or gas from a well;

"flush‑by" means a pumping unit that is used to loosen formation deposits in a well;

"rig" includes a drilling rig and a well servicing rig;

"swabbing unit" means equipment that uses wire rope to lift fluids from a well;

"well servicing rig" means all equipment directly involved with servicing a well;

"well testing" means evaluating the productivity of a well and the quality of the product.

Means of escape
Section 29-13 Means of escape

29‑13(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a derrick is equipped with a specially rigged and securely anchored auxiliary escape line that provides a ready, safe and convenient means of escape from the fourble board and the crown in the derrick.

(2) An escape line required by subsection (1) must be a wire rope with a minimum diameter of 11.5 millimetres and must be installed with a safety buggy that is equipped with a braking device.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the tension on an escape line is sufficient to ensure that a worker descending the escape line can stop 6 metres from the ground anchor point;

(b) an escape line is clearly marked and protected from physical damage;

(c) an escape line is visually inspected by a competent person at least once a week; and

(d) a path of escape is kept free of obstruction.

(4) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that no worker is required or permitted to slide down a pipe, tube, rod, kelly, cable or rope line on a derrick except in an emergency.

Well stimulation
Section 29-33 Well stimulation

29‑33(1). During well stimulation or any similar operation, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) if a working pressure of 2 000 kilopascals or more is applied to the piping system, equipment located between a pump or sand concentrator and the wellhead is controlled remotely from a location outside the potential danger area;

(b) subject to subsection (2), no worker is required or permitted to enter the potential danger area while the system is pressurized;

(c) if liquid carbon dioxide or liquid nitrogen is being used, the pumping unit is designed and positioned so that the valve controls can be operated from the low pressure side of the system;

(d) a check valve is installed as close as is practicable to the wellhead except while cementing or selective acidizing is being done;

(e) if flammable fluids are being pumped during fracturing and acidizing treatment, approved and properly maintained fire suppression equipment is provided;

(f) the rubber mud line used on a cement pumper is not used in place of the kelly hose to break circulation; and

(g) all pumping units, blenders and endless tubing units are continuously bonded to ground.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner may permit a worker to enter the area between the check valve and the wellhead for the purpose of operating the bleed‑off valve if the pumping motor is shut off before the worker enters the area.

First aid attendants
Section 29-38 First aid attendants

29‑38. Notwithstanding section 5‑5, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that at least 1 first aid attendant with a class A qualification is readily available on each shift at each rig.

PART 30

Additional Protection for Electrical Workers

Definitions for Part and Interpretation
Section 30-1 Definitions for Part and Interpretation

30‑1(1). In this Part:

"approved" means approved as defined in The Electrical Inspection Act, 1993;

"electrical equipment" means electrical equipment as defined in The Electrical Inspection Act, 1993;

"electrical worker":

(a) in the case of work of electrical installation as defined in The Electrical Inspection Act, 1993 that is regulated by that Act, means a person who is authorized pursuant to The Electrical Licensing Act to perform that work;

(b) in the case of any work with electrical equipment that is not regulated by The Electrical Inspection Act, 1993, means a person who is qualified to perform that work;

"guarded" means covered, shielded, fenced, enclosed or otherwise protected by suitable covers, casings, barriers, rails, screens, mats, platforms or other equally effective means;

"high voltage" means any voltage over 750 volts;

"lamp" means an artificial source of electric light;

"luminaire" means a complete lighting unit that is designed to accommodate a lamp and to connect the lamp to an electrical power supply;

"readily accessible" means capable of being reached quickly for operation, renewal, or inspection, without requiring a worker to climb over or remove obstacles or to resort to portable means of access.

(2) Nothing in this Part shall be construed as authorizing:

(a) the performance of work by a person if it is unlawful for the person to perform that work because of The Electrical Licensing Act, The Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Act, 1999 the regulations made pursuant to those Acts or any other Act or regulation;

(b) the use of electrical equipment if it is unlawful to use that equipment because of The Electrical Inspection Act, 1993, the regulations made pursuant to that Act or any other Act or regulation; or

(c) the performance of work in a particular manner if it is unlawful to perform the work in that manner because of The Electrical Inspection Act, 1993, the regulations made pursuant to that Act or any other Act or regulation.

Fire extinguishers
Section 30-14 Fire extinguishers

30‑14. An employer or contractor shall ensure that a fire extinguisher approved for Class C fires is readily available to workers working on or near energized high voltage electrical equipment.

Emergency program
Section 30-18 Emergency program

30‑18(1). If an electrical worker may come in contact with an exposed energized electrical conductor and that contact may affect the health or safety of the worker, an employer or contractor shall develop and implement an emergency program that sets out the procedures to be followed in the event of that contact.

(2) An emergency program developed pursuant to subsection (1) must include procedures:

(a) to rescue a worker who has come into contact with a live conductor;

(b) to administer first aid to a worker who has sustained an electric shock; and

(c) to obtain medical assistance.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the workers are adequately trained to implement the emergency program.

PART 31

Additional Protection for Health Care Workers

Cytotoxic drugs
Section 31-5 Cytotoxic drugs

31‑5(1). In this section, "cytotoxic drugs" means drugs that inhibit or prevent the functions of cells and are manufactured, sold or represented for use in treating neoplastic or other conditions.

(2) An employer shall take all practicable steps to minimize the exposure of workers to cytotoxic drugs or to materials or equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs.

(3) If workers prepare parenteral cytotoxic drugs on a frequent and continuing basis, an employer shall provide and maintain an approved biological safety cabinet in accordance with subsection (4) and ensure that workers use the cabinet safely.

(4) A biological safety cabinet must be:

(a) inspected and certified by a competent person at least annually and when the biological safety cabinet is moved; and

(b) used and maintained according to an approved procedure or the manufacturer’s recommendations.

(5) If workers are required to prepare, administer, handle or use cytotoxic drugs or are likely to be exposed to cytotoxic drugs, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop a written program to protect the health and safety of workers who may be exposed to cytotoxic drugs or to materials or equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs.

(6) A program developed pursuant to subsection (5) must include:

(a) the measures to be taken to identify, store, prepare, administer, handle, use, transport and dispose of cytotoxic drugs and materials contaminated with cytotoxic drugs;

(b) the emergency steps to be followed in the event of:

(i) a spill or leak of a cytotoxic drug; or

(ii) worker exposure to cytotoxic drugs by a puncture of the skin, absorption through the skin, contact with an eye, inhalation of drug dust or ingestion of a contaminated substance;

(c) the methods to be followed in maintaining and disposing of equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs;

(d) the use to be made of engineering controls, work practices, hygiene practices and facilities, approved respiratory protective devices, approved eye or face protectors and other personal protective equipment and decontamination materials and equipment that are appropriate in the circumstances; and

(e) the use to be made of an approved biological safety cabinet for the preparation of cytotoxic drugs and the methods to be followed in maintaining the cabinet.

(7) An employer shall:

(a) implement the program developed pursuant to subsection (5);

(b) ensure that all workers who may be exposed to cytotoxic drugs or to materials or equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs are trained in the program; and

(c) make a copy of the program readily available for reference by workers.

Injury log
Section 31-10 Injury log

31‑10(1). An employer or contractor must maintain an injury log for all exposures involving a percutaneous injury with a sharp that may be contaminated.

(2) Entries in the injury log maintained pursuant to subsection (1) must:

(a) protect the confidentiality of the exposed worker or self‑employed person; and

(b) contain at least the following information:

(i) the type and brand of the device involved in the exposure incident;

(ii) the department or work area in which the exposure occurred;

(iii) an explanation of how the exposure occurred.

Ethylene oxide sterilizers
Section 31-13 Ethylene oxide sterilizers

31‑13(1). In this section, "CSA installation standard" means the Canadian Standards Association standard CAN/CSA‑Z314.9‑M89 Installation, Ventilation and Safe Use of Ethylene Oxide Sterilizers in Health Care Facilities.

(2) An employer shall ensure, to the extent that is practicable, that all ethylene oxide sterilizers at a place of employment are operated and maintained in accordance with the CSA installation standard.

(3) An employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop:

(a) safe work practices and policies that meet the requirements of the CSA installation standard; and

(b) an emergency response program to detect, control and respond to any leak or spill of ethylene oxide that meets the requirements of the CSA installation standard.

(4) An employer shall:

(a) implement the safe work practices and policies and the emergency response program developed pursuant to subsection (3); and

(b) ensure that workers who operate ethylene oxide sterilizers and workers who may come into contact with ethylene oxide:

(i) are trained in accordance with the CSA installation standard; and

(ii) follow the safe work practices and policies and the emergency response program developed pursuant to subsection (3).

(5) An employer shall ensure that all areas where ethylene oxide is used or stored are posted with clearly legible signs that state "Ethylene Oxide Area, Potential Cancer and Reproductive Hazard, Authorized Personnel Only".

(6) An employer shall ensure that all records of equipment maintenance and accidental ethylene oxide leakages are kept for 5 years in a log book located in the ethylene oxide sterilization area.

(7) An employer shall ensure that an ethylene oxide sterilizer purchased after the coming into force of these regulations:

(a) is constructed in accordance with the Canadian Standards Association standard CAN/CSA‑Z314.1‑M91 Ethylene Oxide Sterilizers for Hospitals;

(b) is installed in accordance with and meets the ventilation requirements of the CSA installation standard; and

(c) if reasonably practicable, is a sterilizer with in‑chamber aeration that allows sterilization and aeration to take place without manually transferring the items that are being sterilized and aerated from one piece of equipment to another.

(8) An employer shall ensure that portable ethylene oxide sterilizers are operated in a fume cabinet or placed in a self‑contained room that is unoccupied during the sterilization process and is ventilated clear of the place of employment at a minimum rate of 10 air changes per hour to prevent the accumulation of the gas in the room.

PART 32

Additional Protection for Firefighters

Definitions for Part
Section 32-1 Definitions for Part

32‑1. In this Part:

"emergency incident" means the circumstances giving rise to a specific emergency operation;

"emergency medical care" means the provision of treatment to patients, including first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, basic life support, advanced life support and other medical procedures that occur before arriving at a hospital or other health care facility;

"emergency operation" means the activities relating to rescue, fire suppression, emergency medical care and special operations, and includes the response to the scene of an incident and all functions performed at the scene;

"evolution" means a set of standard operating procedures that results in an effective response to an emergency incident;

"firefighter" means a worker whose duties include:

(a) emergency operations, fire inspection and fire investigation; and

(b) training for the activities mentioned in clause (a);

and includes a worker whose duties include directing any or all of the activities mentioned in clauses (a) and (b);

"firefighting vehicle" means a specialized vehicle that carries an assortment of tools and equipment for use by firefighters in emergency operations;

"fire suppression" means the activities involved in controlling and extinguishing fires, including all activities performed at the scene of a fire incident or training exercise that expose firefighters to the dangers of heat, flame, smoke and other products of combustion, explosion, or structural collapse;

"rescue" means activities directed at locating endangered persons at an emergency incident and removing those persons from danger, and includes treating the injured;

"special operations" means emergency incidents to which firefighters respond that require specific and advanced training and specialized tools and equipment, and includes water rescue, confined space entry, high‑angle rescue and incidents involving hazardous materials;

"standard operating procedure" means an operational directive prepared by an employer that establishes a standard course of action for the emergency incidents to which a firefighter is required to respond;

"structural firefighting" means the activities of rescue, fire suppression and property conservation involving buildings, enclosed structures, vehicles, vessels, aircraft or other large objects that are involved in a fire or emergency incident.

Application of Part
Section 32-2 Application of Part

32‑2. This Part applies to firefighters who are engaged in emergency operations on a full‑time or part‑time basis and their employers, but does not apply to:

(a) firefighters fighting wildfires that the ministry, as defined in The Wildlfire Act:

(i) is responsible for, pursuant to section 10 of that Act; or

(ii) takes action to control and extinguish, pursuant to section 12 of that Act; or

(b) firefighters fighting fires underground at mines.

Plan for response to emergency incident
Section 32-3 Plan for response to emergency incident

32‑3(1). An employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop a written plan that establishes the procedures to be followed by firefighters in response to an emergency incident.

(2) A plan required by subsection (1) must include:

(a) identification of standard firefighting functions or evolutions, including functions or evolutions that must be performed simultaneously;

(b) the minimum number of firefighters required to perform safely each identified firefighting function or evolution, based on written standard operating procedures;

(c) the number and types of firefighting vehicles and firefighters required for the initial response to each type of emergency incident to which the firefighters will be expected to respond;

(d) the total complement of firefighting vehicles and firefighters to be dispatched for each type of emergency incident;

(e) a description of a typical emergency operation, including alarm time, response time, arrival sequence, responsibility for initiating standard operating procedures necessary to protect the health and safety of firefighters;

(f) an incident management system; and

(g) a personnel accountability system.

(3) An employer shall:

(a) ensure that the plan developed pursuant to subsection (1) is implemented; and

(b) make a copy of the plan readily available for reference by firefighters.

Training of firefighters
Section 32-4 Training of firefighters

32‑4(1). An employer shall ensure that:

(a) every firefighter receives the training necessary to ensure that the firefighter is able to carry out safely any emergency operation that the firefighter will be expected to carry out;

(b) the training required by clause (a) is provided by competent persons; and

(c) a written record is kept of all training delivered to firefighters pursuant to this Part.

(2) An employer shall ensure that every firefighting vehicle is operated by a competent operator.

General standards for vehicles and equipment
Section 32-5 General standards for vehicles and equipment

32‑5. An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that all firefighting vehicles and all equipment for use in emergency operations are designed, constructed, operated, maintained, inspected and repaired so as to protect adequately the health and safety of firefighters.

Securing of equipment, etc., in vehicles
Section 32-6 Securing of equipment, etc., in vehicles

32‑6. If equipment or personal protective equipment is carried within a seating area of a firefighting vehicle, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the items of equipment are secured:

(i) by a positive mechanical means of holding the item in a stowed position; or

(ii) in a compartment with a positive latching door; and

(b) the compartment mentioned in subclause (a) (ii) is designed to minimize injury to firefighters in the seating area of the vehicle.

Inspection of firefighting vehicles and equipment
Section 32-7 Inspection of firefighting vehicles and equipment

32‑7. An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) all firefighting vehicles and firefighting equipment are inspected by a competent person for defects and unsafe conditions as often as is necessary to ensure that the vehicles and equipment are capable of safe operation;

(b) if a defect or unsafe condition that may create a hazard to a firefighter is identified in a firefighting vehicle or firefighting equipment:

(i) steps are taken immediately to protect the health and safety of any firefighter who may be at risk until the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(ii) as soon as is reasonably practicable, the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(c) a written record:

(i) is kept of all inspections carried out pursuant to clause (a);

(ii) is signed by the competent person who performs the inspection; and

(iii) is kept at the place of employment and is made readily available to the committee, the representative and the firefighters.

Repair of firefighting vehicles
Section 32-8 Repair of firefighting vehicles

32‑8. An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) all repairs to firefighting vehicles of defects or unsafe conditions that may put at risk the health or safety of firefighters are made in accordance with the vehicle manufacturer’s instructions and by qualified persons experienced with the type of vehicle or the type of work to be performed; and

(b) a written record:

(i) is kept of all repairs made to a firefighting vehicle; and

(ii) is kept at the place of employment and is made readily available to the committee, the representative and the firefighters.

Transportation of firefighters
Section 32-9 Transportation of firefighters

32‑9(1) Subject to subsection (3), an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) all firefighting vehicles are provided with safe crew accommodations within the body of the vehicle and are equipped with properly secured seats and seat‑belts;

(b) while a firefighting vehicle is transporting firefighters, every firefighter is seated and uses a seat‑belt when the vehicle is in motion; and

(c) no firefighter rides on the tailstep, side steps, running boards or in any other exposed position on a firefighting vehicle.

(2) If there are an insufficient number of seats available for the number of firefighters who are assigned to or expected to ride on a firefighting vehicle, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that there is a safe alternate means of transportation for those firefighters.

(3) Clauses (1) (b) and (c) do not apply where a firefighter is fighting a prairie, grassland or crop fire, and the employer, contractor or owner ensures that:

(a) a restraining device is used to prevent the firefighter from falling from the firefighting vehicle;

(b) an effective means of communication between the firefighter and the operator of the firefighting vehicle is provided; and

(c) a firefighter does not operate the firefighting vehicle at a speed that exceeds 20 kilometres per hour.

Personal protective equipment
Section 32-10 Personal protective equipment

32‑10. An employer, contractor or owner shall provide to a firefighter who engages in or is exposed to the hazards of emergency operations, and ensure that the firefighter uses, approved personal protective equipment that is appropriate to the nature of the risk to which the firefighter will be exposed and that is adequate to protect the health and safety of the firefighter.

Interior structural firefighting
Section 32-11 Interior structural firefighting

32‑11. If firefighters are required or permitted to engage in interior structural firefighting, an employer shall ensure that:

(a) the firefighters work in teams; and

(b) a suitably equipped rescue team is readily available outside the structure to rescue an endangered firefighter if the firefighter’s SCBA fails or the firefighter becomes incapacitated for any other reason.

Personal alert safety system
Section 32-12 Personal alert safety system

32‑12(1). An employer, contractor or owner shall provide each firefighter who enters a structure during firefighting with an approved personal alarm safety system (PASS) device and ensure that the firefighter uses the device.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that each PASS device is tested at least monthly and before each use, and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Safety ropes, harnesses and hardware
Section 32-13 Safety ropes, harnesses and hardware

32‑13. An employer, contractor or owner shall provide for use by a firefighter approved safety ropes, harnesses and hardware that are appropriate to the nature of the risk to which the firefighter will be exposed and adequate to protect the health and safety of the firefighter, and ensure that the firefighter uses them.


TABLE 1

[Clause (a) of the definition of "class A qualification" in section 1‑2 and subsection 5‑5(2)]
Minimum Requirements for Class A Qualification
AFirst aid training course:
ICourse duration:14‑16 hours
IICourse Content:
The role of the first aid attendant
Interaction with higher‑level trained personnel and with medical care agencies
Medico‑legal aspects of first aid
Responsibilities of the first aid attendant
Knowledge of the ambulance system
Basic anatomy and physiology: how the body systems work
Patient assessment: primary and secondary surveys
Assessment and monitoring of basic vital signs
Respiratory emergencies: respiratory system review, management of airways
Chest injuries: pneumothorax, flail chest, sucking chest wound
Circulatory system review, heart attack, stroke
Bleeding: wounds, control of bleeding and bandaging
Barrier devices to prevent the transmission of pathogens
Shock: signs and symptoms
Abdominal injuries: system review by quadrant
Stabilization: head, spine and pelvis injuries
Upper and lower extremity injuries
Medical emergencies: epilepsy, diabetes
Assessment and treatment of burns
Assessment and treatment of poisonings and acute effects of abused drugs
Problems of heat and cold
Emotional problems
Movement of a casualty
Situation simulations, reporting on the patient to higher‑level trained personnel
Understanding of and familiarity with relevant provisions of The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 2020.
BCardiopulmonary resuscitation training course:
ICourse duration: 4‑6 hours
IICourse Content:
Risk factors
Signals and actions of heart attack and stroke
Airway obstruction: prevention, causes, recognition
Entrance into the emergency medical services system
1 rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (adult)
Treatment of an adult with an obstructed airway
Turning of the casualty into the recovery position.

TABLE 2

[Clause (b) of the definition of "class A qualification" in section 1‑2]
First Aid Services Authorized by Class A Qualification
Primary and secondary assessment
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Bandaging and splinting
Monitoring vital signs
Basic management of medical emergencies
Spine stabilization
Any other services for which the holder of the class A qualification has acquired additional training from an approved authority.

TABLE 3

[Clause (a) of the definition of "class B qualification" in section 1‑2 and subsection 5‑5(2)]
Minimum Requirements for Class B Qualification
AFirst aid training course:
ICourse duration: 60‑80 hours
It is recommended that the review and practice time should be at least 20 hours.
IICourse content:
Roles and responsibility: knowledge of emergency medical system, the place of the first aid attendant in the system, other skill levels in the system
The different phases of emergency medical care
Adequate training in the use of first aid equipment
The medico‑legal aspects of first aid
Anatomy and physiology appropriate to the course
Primary and secondary survey of the casualty
Monitoring and assessment of vital signs
Bleeding: wounds, control of bleeding and bandaging
Barrier devices to prevent the transmission of pathogens
Airway management and use of relevant equipment (eg. bag valve, mask resuscitator, oxygen equipment)
Assessment and treatment of common medical emergencies
Assessment and treatment of shock
Trauma to head, spine, chest, abdomen and pelvis
Injuries to extremities
Environmental emergencies
Crisis intervention: provision of psychological support
First on the scene management skills, triage
Assessment and treatment of burns
Obstetrics: emergency delivery and post‑partum haemorrhage
Recognition of the acute signs and symptoms of drug abuse and treatment of the casualty
Assessment and treatment of the acute (eg. distended or tender) abdomen
Basic extrication of the casualty from immediate danger
Record keeping: preservation of information necessary for subsequent action
Understanding of and familiarity with relevant provisions of The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 2020.
BCardiopulmonary resuscitation training course:
ICourse duration: 8‑10 hours
IICourse content:
Risk factors
Signals and actions of heart attack and stroke
Airway obstruction: prevention, causes, recognition
Entrance into the emergency medical services system
1 rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation
2 rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Treatment of an adult with an obstructed airway
Mouth‑to‑mask resuscitation
Spinal injuries
Turning of the casualty into the recovery position.

TABLE 4

[Clause (b) of the definition of "class B qualification" in section 1‑2]
First Aid Services Authorized by Class B Qualification
Primary and secondary assessment
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation while moving a patient
Bandaging and splinting
Monitoring vital signs
Basic management of medical emergencies
Airway management, the use of suction devices and bag‑valve mask
Proper procedures and conditions for the administration of oxygen
Use of spinal immobilization devices
Psychological support measures
Any other services for which the holder of the Class B qualification has acquired additional training from an approved authority.

TABLE 6

[Subsection 2‑4(2)]
Notifiable Medical Conditions Resulting from Occupational Exposure
1Acute, sub‑acute or chronic disease of an organ resulting from exposure to lead, arsenic, beryllium, phosphorus, manganese, cadmium or mercury or their compounds or alloys
2Neoplasia of the skin or mucous membrane resulting from exposure to tar, pitch, bitumen, mineral or cutting oils or arsenic or their compounds, products or residue
3Neoplasia of the renal tract in a worker employed in rubber compounding, in dyestuff manufacture or mixing or in a laboratory
4Pneumoconiosis resulting from exposure to silica or silicate, including asbestos, talc, mica or coal
5Toxic jaundice resulting from exposure to tetrachloroethane or nitro‑ or amido‑derivatives of benzene or other hepato‑toxic or haemato‑toxic substances
6Neoplasia or any form of sickness resulting from internal or external exposure to ionizing radiation or electro‑magnetic radiation
7Poisoning by the anti‑cholinesterase action of an organophosphorous or carbamate compound
8Any form of decompression illness
9Toxic anaemia resulting from exposure to trinitrotoluene, or any other haematogenic poison, including chronic poisoning by benzene
10Mesothelioma of the pleura or peritoneum
11Angiosarcoma of the liver
12Malignant neoplasm of the nasal cavities resulting from exposure to chromium or its compounds, wood dust or formaldehyde
13Malignant neoplasm of the scrotum resulting from exposure to petroleum products
14Malignant neoplasm of lymphatic or haematopoietic tissue resulting from exposure to benzene
15Cataract resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, electro‑magnetic radiation or nitrophenols
16Male infertility resulting from exposure to glycol ethers, lead or pesticides
17Spontaneous abortion resulting from exposure to ethylene oxide or antineoplastic drugs
18Inflammatory and toxic neuropathy resulting from exposure to organic solvents
19Asthma resulting from exposure to isocyanates, red cedar, amines, acid anhydride, epoxy resin systems, reactive dyes, metal fumes or salts, enzymes or bisulphites
20Extrinsic allergic alveolitis resulting from exposure to mould or organic dust.

TABLE 9

[Clause 5‑5(1) (a) and subsection 5‑5(5)]
Summary of First Aid Personnel Requirements1
Every place of employment requires a first aid kit containing standard supplies as identified through a workplace first aid risk assessment, a manual, a register and emergency information. First aid personnel requirements are listed below and are based on the level of risk associated with the work carried out at the place of employment as determined by a workplace first aid risk assessment:
No. of WorkersLow RiskModerate RiskHigh Risk
2 - 25• Class A attendant• Class A attendant• Class A attendant
26 - 50• Class A attendant• Class B attendant• Class A attendant
• Class B attendant
51 - 100• Class A attendant• Class A attendant• Class A attendant
• Class B attendant• Class B attendant
• 1 person with a license to practice
100 +• 2 Class A attendants• 2 Class A attendants• 2 Class A attendants
• 2 Class B attendants• 2 Class B attendants
• 1 person with a license to practise

TABLE 16

[Sections 21‑4 and 21‑10]
Notifiable Chemical and Biological Substances
A.Any of the following chemical substances or any mixture containing more than 1% of any of them:
CAS NUMBERCHEMICAL SUBSTANCE
92‑67‑14‑Aminobiphenyl
492‑80‑8Auramine
92‑87‑5Benzidine
542‑88‑1bis(Chloromethyl) ether
119‑90‑4o‑Dianisidine
91‑94‑13,3'‑Dichlorobenzidine
107‑30‑2Methyl chloromethyl ether
50‑60‑2Mustard gas
91‑59‑82‑Naphthylamine
92‑93‑34‑Nitrobiphenyl
75‑01‑4Vinyl chloride
B.Any of the following biological substances:
Genetically modified¹ microorganisms²

¹ "genetically modified" means genetic combinations not known to occur naturally.

² "microorganisms" means any organism or consortium of organisms of microscopic size, including bacteria, protozoa, fungi, algae and viruses.

TABLE 17

[Sections 21‑5 and 21‑10]
Designated Chemical Substances
1. Any mixture containing less than 1% of any chemical substance listed in Table 16.
2. Any of the following chemical substances:
CAS* NUMBERCHEMICAL SUBSTANCE
75‑07‑0Acetaldehyde
60‑35‑5Acetamide
79‑06‑1Acrylamide
107‑13‑1Acrylonitrile
1402‑68‑2Aflatoxins
60‑09‑3para‑Aminoazobenzene
97‑56‑3ortho‑Aminoazotoluene
712‑68‑52‑Amino‑5(5‑nitro‑2‑furyl)‑1,3,4‑thiadiazole
61‑82‑5Amitrole
90‑04‑0ortho‑Anisidine
1309‑64‑4Antimony trioxide
7440‑38‑2Arsenic and arsenic mixtures
1332‑21‑4Asbestos
1912‑24‑9Atrazine
151‑56‑4Aziridine
98‑87‑3Benzal chloride
71‑43‑2Benzene
________________Benzidine‑based dyes
271‑89‑6Benzofuran
98‑07‑7Benzotrichloride
98‑88‑4Benzoyl chloride
100‑44‑7Benzyl chloride
1694‑09‑3Benzyl violet 4B
Beryllium and beryllium compounds
75‑27‑4Bromodichloromethane
3296‑90‑02,2‑bis(bromomethyl)propane‑1,3,‑diol
106‑99‑01,3‑Butadiene
3068‑88‑0beta‑Butyrolactone
25013‑16‑5Butylated hydroxyanisole
Cadmium and cadmium compounds
2425‑06‑1Captafol
56‑23‑5Carbon tetrachloride
9000‑07‑01Carrageenan, degraded
________________Chlordane isomers
115‑28‑6Chlorendic acid
________________Chlorinated paraffins
106‑47‑8para‑chloroaniline
67‑66‑3Chloroform
95‑57‑82‑Chlorophenol
108‑43‑03‑Chlorophenol
106‑48‑94‑Chlorophenol
95‑83‑04‑Chloro‑ortho‑phenylenediamine
95‑69‑2para‑Chloro‑ortho‑toluidine
1897‑45‑6Chlorothalonil
________________Chromium compounds, hexavalent
6459‑94‑5CI Red 114
569‑61‑9CI Basic Red 9
2429‑74‑5CI Direct Blue 15
6358‑53‑8Citrus Red 2
8007‑45‑2Coal‑tar pitches
8007‑45‑2Coal‑tars
________________Cobalt and cobalt compounds
8001‑58‑9Creosotes
120‑71‑8para‑Cresidine
14901‑08‑7Cycasin
________________DDT and isomers
613‑35‑4N,N'‑Diacetylbenzidine
615‑05‑42,4‑Diaminoanisole
101‑80‑44,4'‑Diaminodiphenyl ether
95‑80‑72,4‑Diaminotoluene
334‑88‑3Diazomethane
226‑36‑8; 224‑42‑0Dibenzacridine
96‑12‑81,2‑Dibromo‑3‑chloropropane
79‑43‑6Dichloroacetic acid
106‑46‑7para‑Dichlorobenzene
764‑41‑01,4‑Dichloro‑2‑butene
107‑06‑21,2‑Dichloroethane
75‑09‑2Dichloromethane
542‑75‑61,3‑Dichloropropene (technical grade)
62‑73‑7Dichlorovos
1464‑53‑5Diepoxybutane
117‑81‑7Di(2‑ethylhexyl)phthalate
Diesel engine exhaust
1615‑80‑11,2‑Diethylhydrazine
64‑67‑5Diethyl sulphate
101‑90‑6Diglycidyl resorcinol ether
2973‑10‑6Diisopropyl sulphate
79‑44‑7Dimethylcarbamoyl chloride
68‑12‑2Dimethylformamide
57‑14‑71,1‑Dimethylhydrazine
540‑73‑81,2‑Dimethylhydrazine
77‑78‑1Dimethyl sulphate
________________Dinitropyrenes
25321‑14‑6Dinitrotoluene
123‑91‑11,4‑Dioxane
2475‑48‑8Disperse blue
106‑89‑8Epichlorohydrin
106‑88‑71,2‑Epoxybutane
66733‑21‑9Erionite
140‑88‑5Ethyl acrylate
100‑41‑4Ethyl Benzene
74‑96‑4Ethyl bromide
106‑93‑4Ethylene dibromide
75‑21‑8Ethylene oxide
96‑45‑7Ethylene thiourea
62‑50‑0Ethyl methanesulphonate
759‑73‑9N‑Ethyl‑N‑nitrosourea
50‑00‑0Formaldehyde
3570‑75‑02‑(2‑Formylhydrazino)‑4‑(5‑nitro‑2‑furyl) thiazole
________________Gasoline
765‑34‑4Glycidaldehyde
2784‑94‑3HC Blue 1
76‑44‑8Heptachlor
118‑74‑1Hexachlorobenzene
87‑68‑3Hexachlorobutadiene
608‑73‑1Hexachlorocyclohexanes
67‑72‑1Hexachloroethane
680‑31‑9Hexamethylphosphoramide
302‑01‑2Hydrazine
22398‑80‑7Indium phosphide
193‑39‑5Indone[1,2,3‑cd]pyrene
78‑79‑5Isoprene
143‑50‑0Kepone
________________Lead (+ compounds), inorganics
632‑99‑5Magenta (contains CI Basic Red 9)
________________Marine diesel fuels
484‑20‑85‑Methoxypsoralen
75‑55‑82‑Methylaziridine
101‑14‑44,4'‑Methylene bis(2‑chloroaniline)
838‑88‑04,4'‑Methylene bis(2‑methylaniline)
101‑77‑94,4'‑Methylene dianiline
60‑34‑4Methyl hydrazine
74‑88‑4Methyl iodide
________________Methylmercury Compounds
66‑27‑3Methyl methanesulphonate
129‑15‑72‑Methyl‑1‑nitroanthraquinone
684‑93‑5N‑Methyl‑N‑nitrosourea
615‑53‑2N‑Methyl‑N‑nitrosourethane
8012‑95‑1Mineral oils, untreated and mildly treated
2385‑85‑5Mirex
50‑60‑2Mustard gas
________________Nickel (+ compounds)
12035‑72‑2Nickel subsulphide
________________Nitrilotriacetic acid and its salts
1836‑75‑5Nitrofen (technical grade)
607‑57‑82‑Nitrofluorene
555‑84‑01‑[(5‑Nitrofurfurylidene) amino]‑2‑imidazolidinone
51‑75‑2Nitrogen mustard
79‑46‑92‑Nitropropane
5522‑43‑0; 57835‑92‑4Nitropyrene isomers
924‑16‑3N‑Nitrosodi‑n‑butylamine
1116‑54‑7N‑Nitrosodiethanolamine
55‑18‑5N‑Nitrosodiethylamine
62‑75‑9N‑Nitrosodimethylamine
621‑64‑7N‑Nitrosodi‑N‑propylamine
4549‑40‑0N‑Nitrosomethylvinylamine
59‑89‑2N‑Nitrosomorpholine
16543‑55‑8N‑Nitrosonornicotine
100‑75‑4N‑Nitrosopiperidine
930‑55‑2N‑Nitrosopyrrolidine
13256‑22‑9N‑Nitrososarcosine
2646‑17‑5Oil orange SS
12174‑11‑7Palygorskite (attapulgite)(long fibres, > 5 micron
________________Penta/hexa cyclic unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons
135‑88‑6N‑Phenyl‑beta‑naphthylamine
95‑54‑5o‑Phenylenediamine
122‑60‑1Phenylglycidyl ether
100‑63‑0Phenylhydrazine
36355‑01‑8Polybrominated biphenyls
1336‑36‑3Polychlorinated biphenyls
3564‑0908; 3761‑53‑3Ponceau 3R
7758‑01‑2Potassium bromate
1120‑71‑41,3‑Propane sultone
57‑57‑8ß‑Propiolactone
75‑55‑8Propylene imine
75‑56‑9Propylene oxide
Refractory ceramic fibres
________________Residual fuel oils (heavy fuel oils)
94‑59‑7Safrole
68308‑34‑9Shale‑oils
________________Silica crystalline (respirable size)
409‑21‑2Silicon carbide, fibrous (including whiskers)
132‑27‑4Sodium ortho‑phenylphenate
________________Soots from pyrolysis of heating fuels
100‑42‑5Styrene
96‑09‑3Styrene‑7,8‑oxide
95‑06‑7Sulphallate
Sulphuric acid (strong acid mist exposure, only)
1746‑01‑62,3,7,8‑Tetrachlorodibenzo‑para‑dioxin
127‑18‑4Tetrachloroethylene
116‑14‑3Tetrafluoroethylene
509‑14‑8Tetranitromethane
62‑55‑5Thioacetamide
139‑65‑1Thiodianiline
141‑90‑2Thiouracil
62‑56‑6Thiourea
119‑93‑7ortho‑Tolidine
584‑84‑9Toluene diisocyanates
95‑53‑4ortho‑Toluidine
106‑49‑0para‑Toluidine
8001‑35‑2Chlorinated camphene
52‑24‑4Tris(1‑aziridinyl)phosphine sulphide
126‑72‑7Tris(2,3‑dibromopropyl)phosphate
72‑57‑1Trypan Blue
Uranium, (natural) soluble and insoluble compounds
51‑79‑6Urethane
108‑05‑4Vinyl acetate
593‑60‑2Vinyl bromide
100‑40‑34‑Vinyl cyclohexene
106‑87‑6Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide
75‑02‑5Vinyl fluoride
Wood dusts (Oak, Beech, Birch, Mahogany, Teak and Walnut)
13530‑65‑9; 11103‑86‑9; 37300‑23‑5Zinc chromates
1300‑73‑8Xylidine isomers

* CAS means the Chemical Abstracts Service Division of the American Chemical Society.

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