Hazard Assessment

A hazard is an activity, situation or substance that could cause harm. Risk is the chance that a hazard will cause harm. Hazard assessment is the process of identifying workplace hazards (both existing and potential), assessing the risk, implementing controls and reviewing to ensure hazards are eliminated or the risk minimized.

Hazard assessment is a proactive activity to improve health and safety. By identifying hazards and implementing controls, the workplace can prevent injuries and illnesses and the associated costs (both human and financial). Hazard assessment is an important foundation for other elements of a health and safety system, such as inspections, training, practices and procedures.

There are many methods to identify hazards. An important method is a job hazard analysis (JHA). JHA is the process of systematically evaluating a job, task, process or procedure to identify hazards and their associated risks, and then eliminating or reducing the risks to be as low as reasonably possible in order to protect workers from injury. Job hazard analysis is sometimes called job safety analysis or job task analysis. JHAs can be done through discussion and observation (example: using photos and videos).

Other methods to identify hazards include formal and informal hazard and risk assessment processes, inspections, field level risk assessments, hazard and risk assessments related to emergency procedures, procurement hazard and risk assessments.

It is very important to involve workers, especially those with experience, when conducting hazard assessments.

An employer should:

  • Define hazard reporting processes
  • Conduct hazard assessments
  • Assess the risk of the identified hazards using a risk assessment methodology
  • Implement controls to address identified hazards, focusing on hazards with the greatest risk first, considering:
    • hierarchy of controls:
      • elimination/substitution, engineering, administrative (including safe work practices/procedures and training), personal protective equipment (PPE)
      • at the source, along the path, at the worker level
    • regulatory and other established standards
  • Follow up on hazard controls to ensure they:
    • have been implemented as intended
    • are effective; and
    • have not created new hazards
  • Maintain records of completed hazard assessments

Steps to perform a job hazard analysis:

1. Inventory occupations

2. Inventory tasks for each of the occupations

3. Prioritize and select tasks, considering:

  • Risk
  • Newly established tasks
  • Modified tasks
  • Infrequently performed tasks

4. Break task into basic steps

5. Identify all hazards present within each step

6. Assess risk

7. Identify controls

8. Implement controls

9. Reassess risk

10. Communicate and provide training

11. Review JHA’s:

  • when changes are made to the operational processes, such as new equipment or different materials
  • following an incident
  • at least every 3 years

The following legislation is not all inclusive. You are responsible for knowing and complying with all legislation applicable to your place of employment. Please refer to the original legislation to find out exactly what requirements apply to your business. WorkSafe Saskatchewan does not offer any advice as to your obligations under any applicable legislation, and assumes no responsibility or liability for your obligations under the applicable legislation.

You can download copies of legislation for free from http://www.publications.gov.sk.ca/legislation.cfm.

Saskatchewan Employment Act

Part III

Occupational Health and Safety

DIVISION 3

Duties

3‑8. Every employer shall:

(a) ensure, insofar as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all of the employer’s workers;

(b) consult and cooperate in a timely manner with any occupational health committee or the occupational health and safety representative at the place of employment for the purpose of resolving concerns on matters of health, safety and welfare at work;

(c) make a reasonable attempt to resolve, in a timely manner, concerns raised by an occupational health committee or occupational health and safety representative pursuant to clause (b);

(d) ensure, insofar as is reasonably practicable, that the employer’s workers are not exposed to harassment with respect to any matter or circumstance arising out of the workers’ employment;

(e) cooperate with any other person exercising a duty imposed by this Part or the regulations made pursuant to this Part;

(f) ensure that:

(i) the employer’s workers are trained in all matters that are necessary to protect their health, safety and welfare; and

(ii) all work at the place of employment is sufficiently and competently supervised;

(g) if the employer is required to designate an occupational health and safety representative for a place of employment, ensure that written records of meetings with the occupational health and safety representative are kept and are readily available at the place of employment;

(h) ensure, insofar as is reasonably practicable, that the activities of the employer’s workers at a place of employment do not negatively affect the health, safety or welfare at work of the employer, other workers or any self‑employed person at the place of employment; and

(i) comply with this Part and the regulations made pursuant to this Part.

3‑27. (1) The duties of an occupational health committee are the following:

(a) to participate in the identification and control of health and safety hazards in or at the place of employment;

(b) to cooperate with the occupational health and safety service, if any, established for the place of employment;

(c) to establish, promote and recommend the means of delivery of occupational health and safety programs for the education and information of workers;

(d) to maintain records with respect to the duties of the committee pursuant to this section;

(e) to investigate any matter mentioned in section 3‑31;

(f) to receive, consider and resolve matters respecting the health and safety of workers;

(g) to carry out any other duties that are specified in this Part or the regulations made pursuant to this Part.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the duties of the occupational health committee imposed by this Part or the regulations made pursuant to this Part are not diminished by any other committee established within the place of employment by the employer or contractor.

3‑28. (1) The duties of an occupational health and safety representative are the following:

(a) to participate in the identification and control of health and safety hazards in or at the place of employment;

(b) to cooperate with the occupational health and safety service, if any, established for the place of employment;

(c) to receive and distribute to workers information regarding health and safety;

(d) to receive, consider and resolve matters respecting the health and safety of workers;

(e) to carry out any other duties that are specified in this Part or the regulations made pursuant to this Part.

(2) The occupational health and safety representative shall perform his or duties in consultation with the employer.

3‑20. (1) An employer at a prescribed place of employment shall establish and maintain an occupational health and safety program or a prescribed part of an occupational health and safety program in accordance with the regulations made pursuant to this Part.

(2) An occupational health and safety program at a prescribed place of employment must be established and designed in consultation with:

(a) the occupational health committee;

(b) the occupational health and safety representative; or

(c) the workers, if there is no occupational health committee and no occupational health and safety representative.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must include all prescribed documents, information and matters.

(4) An occupational health and safety program at a prescribed place of employment must be in writing and must be made available, on request, to the occupational health committee, the occupational health and safety representative, the workers or an occupational health officer.

(5) If the work at a place of employment is carried on pursuant to contracts between a contractor and two or more employers, the contractor shall coordinate the occupational health and safety programs of all employers at the place of employment.

(6) The director of occupational health and safety may order an employer to develop an occupational health and safety program for a place of employment if the director considers it to be in the interests of the health, safety and welfare of the employer’s workers based on the criteria set out in subsection (8).

(7) An order issued pursuant to subsection (6) must be in writing.

(8) In making an order pursuant to subsection (6), the director of occupational health and safety shall consider the following criteria:

(a) the frequency of occupationally related injuries and illnesses at the place of employment;

(b) the number and nature of the notices of contravention relating to the place of employment and the history of compliance with those orders and with compliance undertakings;

(c) any additional criteria that the director considers appropriate to protect the health, safety and welfare of workers.

3‑21. (1) An employer operating at a prescribed place of employment where violent situations have occurred or may reasonably be expected to occur shall develop and implement a written policy statement and prevention plan to deal with potentially violent situations after consultation with:

(a) the occupational health committee;

(b) the occupational health and safety representative; or

(c) the workers, if there is no occupational health committee and no occupational health and safety representative.

(2) A policy statement and prevention plan required pursuant to subsection (1) must include any prescribed provisions.

Division 4 Occupational Health Committees and Occupational Health and Safety Representatives

DIVISION 7

Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System

3‑48. Without restricting the generality of section 3‑8 or limiting the duties of an employer pursuant to this Part and the regulations made pursuant to this Part, but subject to any prescribed exemptions, every employer shall, with respect to every place of employment controlled by that employer:

(a) ensure that concentrations of biological substances and chemical substances in the place of employment are controlled in accordance with prescribed standards;

(b) ensure that all biological substances and chemical substances in the place of employment are stored, handled and disposed of in the prescribed manner;

(c) ensure that all biological substances and chemical substances in the place of employment, other than hazardous products, are identified in the prescribed manner;

(d) subject to section 3‑50, ensure that each hazardous product in the place of employment or each container in the place of employment in which a hazardous product is contained:

(i) has a label that discloses all applicable prescribed information applied to it; and

(ii) has all applicable prescribed pictograms displayed on it in the prescribed manner; and

(e) subject to section 3‑50, make available to the employer’s workers, to the prescribed extent and in the prescribed manner, a safety data sheet with respect to each hazardous product in the place of employment that discloses:

(i) if the hazardous product is a pure substance, the biological or chemical identity of the hazardous product and, if the hazardous product is not a pure substance, the biological or chemical identity of any ingredient of it that is a hazardous product and the concentration of that ingredient;

(ii) the biological or chemical identity of any ingredient of the hazardous product that the employer has reasonable grounds to believe may be harmful to a worker and the concentration of that ingredient;

(iii) the biological or chemical identity of any ingredient of the hazardous product of which the toxicological properties are not known to the employer and the concentration of that ingredient; and

(iv) any prescribed information with respect to the hazardous product.

[S.S. 2015, c. 31, s. 3]

OHS Regulations

PART III

General Duties

19. (1) An employer shall ensure that a worker is trained in all matters that are necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker when the worker:

(a) begins work at a place of employment; or

(b) is moved from one work activity or worksite to another that differs with respect to hazards, facilities or procedures.

(2) The training required by subsection (1) must include:

(a) procedures to be taken in the event of a fire or other emergency;

(b) the location of first aid facilities;

(c) identification of prohibited or restricted areas;

(d) precautions to be taken for the protection of the worker from physical, chemical or biological hazards;

(e) any procedures, plans, policies and programs that the employer is required to develop pursuant to the Act or any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the worker's work at the place of employment; and

(f) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of the worker while the worker is at work.

(3) An employer shall ensure that the time spent by a worker in the training required by subsection (1) is credited to the worker as time at work, and that the worker does not lose pay or other benefits with respect to that time.

(4) An employer shall ensure that no worker is permitted to perform work unless the worker:

(a) has been trained, and has sufficient experience, to perform the work safely and in compliance with the Act and the regulations; or

(b) is under close and competent supervision.

22. (1) Subject to subsection (2), an occupational health and safety program required bysection 13 of the Act must include:

(a) a statement of the employer's policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of the workers;

(b) the identification of existing and potential risks to the health or safety of workers at the place of employment and the measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate or control those risks;

(c) the identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that may be required to respond to an emergency;

(d) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(e) a schedule for the regular inspection of the place of employment and of work processes and procedures;

(f) a plan for the control of any biological or chemical substance handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the place of employment and, where appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(g) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including any procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop pursuant to the Act or any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the work of the workers and supervisors;

(h) a procedure for the investigation of accidents, dangerous occurrences and refusals to work pursuant to section 23 of the Act at the place of employment;

(i) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of accidents, dangerous occurrences and refusals to work pursuant tosection 23 of the Act ; and

(j) a procedure to review and, where necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program at specified intervals that are not greater than three years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that may affect the health or safety of workers.

(2) On and after January 1, 1998, the places of employment set out in Table 7 of the Appendix with 10 or more workers are prescribed for the purposes ofsection 13 of the Act .

(3) An employer at a place of employment mentioned in subsection (2) shall establish an occupational health and safety program that meets the requirements of subsection (1) not later than:

(a) in a place of employment with 100 or more workers, January 1, 1998;

(b) in a place of employment with 21 or more workers but not more than 99 workers, January 1, 1999; and

(c) in a place of employment with 10 or more workers but not more than 20 workers, January 1, 2000.

35. (1) In this section, "to work alone" means to work at a worksite as the only worker of the employer or contractor at that worksite, in circumstances where assistance is not readily available to the worker in the event of injury, ill health or emergency.

(2) Where a worker is required to work alone or at an isolated place of employment, an employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers, shall identify the risks arising from the conditions and circumstances of the worker's work or the isolation of the place of employment.

(3) An employer or contractor shall take all reasonably practicable steps to eliminate or reduce the risks identified pursuant to subsection (2).

(4) The steps to be taken to eliminate or reduce the risks pursuant to subsection (3):

(a) must include the establishment of an effective communication system that consists of:

(i) radio communication;

(ii) phone or cellular phone communication; or

(iii) any other means that provides effective communication in view of the risks involved; and

(b) may include any of the following:

(i) regular contact by the employer or contractor with the worker working alone or at an isolated place of employment;

(ii) limitations on, or prohibitions of, specified activities;

(iii) establishment of minimum training or experience, or other standards of competency;

(iv) provision of personal protective equipment;

(v) establishment of safe work practices or procedures;

(vi) provision of emergency supplies for use in travelling under conditions of extreme cold or other inclement weather conditions.

37. (1) In this section, "violence" means the attempted, threatened or actual conduct of a person that causes or is likely to cause injury, and includes any threatening statement or behaviour that gives a worker reasonable cause to believe that the worker is at risk of injury.

(2) On and after January 1, 1997, places of employment that provide the following services or activities are prescribed for the purposes ofsubsection 14(1) of the Act :

(a) services provided by health care facilities mentioned in subclauses 468(b)(i) to (v) and (xii);

(b) pharmaceutical-dispensing services;

(c) education services;

(d) police services;

(e) corrections services;

(f) other law enforcement services;

(g) security services;

(h) crisis counselling and intervention services;

(i) late night retail premises as defined in section 37.1;

(j) financial services;

(k) the sale of alcoholic beverages or the provision of premises for the consumption of alcoholic beverages;

(l) taxi services;

(m) transit services.

(3) A policy statement required bysubsection 14(1) of the Act must be in writing and must include:

(a) the employer's commitment to minimize or eliminate the risk;

(b) the identification of the worksite or worksites where violent situations have occurred or may reasonably be expected to occur;

(c) the identification of any staff positions at the place of employment that have been, or may reasonably be expected to be, exposed to violent situations;

(d) the procedure to be followed by the employer to inform workers of the nature and extent of risk from violence, including, except where the disclosure is prohibited by law, any information in the employer's possession related to the risk of violence from persons who have a history of violent behaviour and whom workers are likely to encounter in the course of their work;

(e) the actions the employer will take to minimize or eliminate the risk, including the use of personal protective equipment, administrative arrangements and engineering controls;

(f) the procedure to be followed by a worker who has been exposed to a violent incident to report the incident to the employer;

(g) the procedure the employer will follow to document and investigate a violent incident reported pursuant to clause (f);

(h) a recommendation that any worker who has been exposed to a violent incident consult the worker's physician for treatment or referral for post-incident counselling; and

(i) the employer's commitment to provide a training program for workers that includes:

(i) the means to recognize potentially violent situations;

(ii) procedures, work practices, administrative arrangements and engineering controls that have been developed to minimize or eliminate the risk to workers;

(iii) the appropriate responses of workers to incidents of violence, including how to obtain assistance; and

(iv) procedures for reporting violent incidents.

(4) Where a worker receives treatment or counselling mentioned in clause (3)(h) or attends a training program mentioned in clause (3)(i), an employer shall credit the worker's attendance as time at work and ensure that the worker loses no pay or other benefits.

(5) An employer shall make readily available for reference by workers a copy of the policy statement required bysubsection 14(1) of the Act .

(6) An employer shall ensure that the policy statement required by subsection 14(1) of the Act is reviewed and, where necessary, revised every three years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that may affect the health or safety of workers.

[Sask. Reg. 75/2012, s. 3]

37.1 (1) In this section, "late night retail premises" means a place of employment that is open to the public between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. for the purposes of making retail sales to consumers.

(2) In addition to the requirements imposed by sections 35 and 37, an employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall conduct a workplace hazard assessment in accordance with an approved industry standard.

(3) The employer shall conduct the workplace hazard assessment required by subsection (2):

(a) in the case of an employer who operates a late night retail premises on the day on which this section comes into force, as soon as is reasonably practicable after the day on which this section comes into force;

(b) in the case of an employer who operates a place of employment that becomes a late night retail premises after the day on which this section comes into force, as soon as is reasonably practicable after the day on which the place of employment became a late night retail premises.

(4) An employer shall ensure that the workplace hazard assessment required by subsection (2) is reviewed and, if necessary, revised every three years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that may affect the health or safety of workers.

(5) In addition to the requirements of sections 35 and 37, an employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall implement the following security measures:

(a) the development of written safe cash handling procedures that minimize the amount of money that is readily accessible to the worker in the establishment;

(b) the use of video cameras that capture key areas in the workplace, including the cash desk and the outdoor gas pumps, if applicable;

(c) the establishment of measures to ensure good visibility into and out of the premises; and

(d) the placement of signs to indicate:

(i) the worker’s limited accessibility to cash and valuables; and

(ii) the use of video cameras on the premises.

(6) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises that has one worker working alone between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. shall, in addition to the requirements set out in section 35 and subsection (5):

(a) implement a check-in system and a written check-in procedure for that worker; and

(b) provide a personal emergency transmitter to be worn by the worker that signals for emergency response when activated.

[Sask. Reg. 75/2012, s. 4]

PART V

First Aid

52. Subject to section 53, an employer, contractor or owner shall:

(a) provide the personnel, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation required by this Part to render prompt and appropriate first aid to workers at every worksite;

(b) in consultation with the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers, review the provisions of this Part;

(c) if the provisions of this Part are not adequate to meet any specific hazard at a place of employment, provide additional suitable personnel, supplies, equipment and facilities that are appropriate for the hazard; and

(d) ensure that, where a worker may be entrapped or incapacitated in a situation that may be dangerous to any person involved in the rescue operation:

(i) an effective written procedure for the rescue of that worker is developed; and

(ii) suitable personnel and rescue equipment are provided.

61. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a means of transportation for injured workers to a medical facility or hospital is available.

(2) The following meet the requirements of subsection (1):

(a) an ambulance service that is within 30 minutes' travel time from the ambulance base to the place of employment under normal travel conditions; or

(b) a means of transportation that is suitable, having regard to the distance to be travelled and the risks to which workers are exposed, that affords protection against the weather and is equipped, where reasonably practicable, with a means of communication that permits contact with the medical facility or hospital to which the injured worker is being transported and with the place of employment.

(3) Where a stretcher is required to be provided pursuant to subsection 60(3), an employer or contractor shall ensure that the means of transportation provided pursuant to clause (2)(b) is capable of accommodating and securing an occupied stretcher.

(4) An employer or contractor shall provide a means of communication to summon the transportation required by subsection (1).

(5) Where a worker is seriously injured or, in the opinion of a first aid attendant, needs to be accompanied during transportation, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker is accompanied by a first aid attendant during transportation.

62. Where a worker is at risk of asphyxiation or poisoning, an employer or contractor shall ensure that all practicable emergency arrangements are made for the rescue of the worker and for the prompt provision of antidotes, supportive measures, first aid, medical attention and any other measures that are appropriate to the nature and probable effects of the asphyxia or poisoning.

PART VI

General Health Requirements

64. (1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a place of employment is sanitary and kept as clean as is reasonably practicable and shall ensure, to the extent that is reasonably practicable, that:

(a) dirt and debris are removed at least daily by a suitable method from all floors, working surfaces, stairways and passages;

(b) floors are cleaned at least once each week by washing, vacuum cleaning or any other effective and suitable method; and

(c) all inside walls, partitions, ceilings, passages and staircases are clean and are suitably finished and maintained.

(2) Where a worker may be exposed to refuse, spills or waste materials that may pose a risk to the worker's health or safety, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the refuse, spill or waste material is removed by a suitable method from the worksite as soon as is practicable.

68. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that no part of a place of employment is overcrowded to a degree that may cause risk of injury to workers.

(2) Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), an employer or contractor shall ensure that there is at least 10 cubic metres of space for each worker employed at any one time at a worksite.

(3) For the purposes of subsection (2), no space that is more than three metres from the floor and no space occupied by solid objects is to be taken into account.

70. (1) Subject to subsection (3), in an indoor place of employment, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide and maintain thermal conditions, including air temperature, radiant temperature, humidity and air movement, that:

(a) are appropriate to the nature of the work performed;

(b) provide effective protection for the health and safety of workers; and

(c) provide reasonable thermal comfort for workers.

(2) At an indoor place of employment where the thermal environment is likely to be a health or safety concern to the workers, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide and maintain an appropriate and suitably located instrument for measuring the thermal conditions.

(3) Where it is not reasonably practicable to control thermal conditions or where work is being performed outdoors, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide and maintain measures for:

(a) the effective protection of the health and safety of workers; and

(b) the reasonable thermal comfort of workers.

(4) Measures for the purposes set out in subsection (3) may include, but are not limited to, the following:

(a) frequent monitoring of thermal conditions;

(b) the provision of special or temporary equipment, including screens, shelters and temporary heating or cooling equipment;

(c) the provision of suitable clothing or personal protective equipment;

(d) the provision of hot or cold drinks;

(e) the use of acclimatization or other physiological procedures;

(f) the use of limited work schedules with rest and recovery periods, changes in workloads, changes in hours or other arrangements for work;

(g) frequent observation of workers by a person who is trained to recognize the symptoms of physiological stress resulting from extreme temperatures;

(h) the provision of emergency supplies for use when travelling under extremely cold or inclement weather conditions.

(5) Where a worker is required to work in thermal conditions that are different from those associated with the worker's normal duties, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, any suitable clothing or other personal protective equipment that is necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker.

69. (1) While workers are present at a worksite, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide lighting that is sufficient to protect the health and safety of workers and suitable for the work to be done at the worksite.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the illumination of all parts of a place of employment where workers pass, other than underground at a mine, is at least five decalux.

(3) Where failure of the regular lighting system is likely to create conditions dangerous to the health or safety of workers, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide appropriate emergency lighting of at least five decalux for the worksite and exit routes from the worksite.

(4) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) light fixtures, windows and skylights that provide light for work are, where practicable, kept clean and free from any obstruction, except for special treatment of light fixtures, windows or skylights to reduce heat or glare; and

(b) artificial light sources and reflective surfaces are positioned, screened or provided with a shade, where practicable, to prevent glare or the formation of shadows that cause discomfort or a risk of accident to a worker.

81. (1) In this section, "musculoskeletal injury" means an injury or disorder of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, joints, bones or supporting vasculature that may be caused or aggravated by any of the following:

(a) repetitive motions;

(b) forceful exertions;

(c) vibration;

(d) mechanical compression;

(e) sustained or awkward postures;

(f) limitations on motion or action;

(g) other ergonomic stressors.

(2) An employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall regularly review the activities at the place of employment that may cause or aggravate musculoskeletal injuries.

(3) Where a risk of musculoskeletal injury is identified, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) inform each worker who may be at risk of developing musculoskeletal injury of that risk and of the signs and common symptoms of any musculoskeletal injury associated with that worker's work; and

(b) provide effective protection for each worker who may be at risk, which may include any of the following:

(i) providing equipment that is designed, constructed, positioned and maintained to reduce the harmful effects of an activity;

(ii) implementing appropriate work practices and procedures to reduce the harmful effects of an activity;

(iii) implementing work schedules that incorporate rest and recovery periods, changes in workload or other arrangements for alternating work to reduce the harmful effects of an activity.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that workers who may be at risk of developing musculoskeletal injury are instructed in the safe performance of the worker's work, including the use of appropriate work practices and procedures, equipment and personal protective equipment.

(5) Where a worker has symptoms of musculoskeletal injury, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) advise the worker to consult a physician or a health care professional who is registered or licensed pursuant to an Act to practise any of the healing arts; and

(b) promptly review the activities of that worker and of other workers doing similar tasks to identify any cause of the symptoms and to take corrective measures to avoid further injuries.

82. Where a worker works shifts or a worker's work demands constant and uninterrupted mental effort or constant and uninterrupted physical exertion, an employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall:

(a) assess the risks to the worker's health and safety of the worker's work; and

(b) inform the worker of the nature and extent of the risks mentioned in clause (a) and the ways to eliminate or reduce those risks.

83. (1) An employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall identify any tasks that involve a potentially harmful visual demand on a worker.

(2) An employer or contractor:

(a) shall take all practicable steps to reduce the harmful visual demand of those tasks;

(b) shall inform the worker of the risk of performing those tasks;

(c) shall advise the worker to consult a physician or an optometrist if any persistent vision impairment, disability or visual strain results from performing the tasks;

(d) where a worker cannot attend a consultation mentioned in clause (c) during the worker's time off work, shall permit the worker to attend the consultation during normal working hours without loss of pay or other benefits; and

(e) where a worker cannot recover the costs of a consultation mentioned in clause (c), shall reimburse the worker for the costs of the consultation that, in the opinion of the director, are reasonable.

85. (1) In this section:

(a) "engineering controls" means physical controls or barriers that isolate or remove an infectious disease hazard and includes:

(i) medical devices approved by Health Canada that have engineered sharps injury protections;

(ii) sharps disposal containers;

(iii) needleless systems and needles with engineered sharps injury protections as defined in section 474.1; and

(iv) other devices that isolate or remove sharps hazards;

(b) "expose" means harmful contact with an infectious material or organism from inhalation, ingestion, skin or mucous membrane contact or percutaneous injury;

(c) "exposure control plan" means an exposure control plan required pursuant to subsection (2);

(d) "infectious material or organism" means an infectious material or organism that has been identified in an approved manner as an infectious disease hazard that poses a significantly increased exposure risk to a worker or self-employed person.

(2) If workers are required to handle, use or produce an infectious material or organism or are likely to be exposed at a place of employment, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop and implement an exposure control plan to eliminate or minimize worker exposure.

(3) An exposure control plan must:

(a) be in writing;

(b) identify any workers at the place of employment who may be exposed;

(c) identify categories of tasks and procedures that may put workers at risk of exposure;

(d) describe the ways in which an infectious material or organism can enter the body of a worker and the risks associated with that entry;

(e) describe the signs and symptoms of any disease that may arise for a worker exposed at the place of employment;

(f) describe infection control measures to be used, such as the following:

(i) vaccination;

(ii) engineering controls;

(iii) personal protective equipment;

(iv) safe work practices and procedures; and

(v) standard practices that incorporate universal precautions;

(g) identify the limitations of the infection control measures described pursuant to clause (f);

(h) set out procedures to be followed in each of the following circumstances:

(i) if there has been a spill or leak of an infectious material or organism;

(ii) if a worker has been exposed;

(iii) if a worker believes that he or she has been exposed;

(i) set out the methods of cleaning, disinfecting or disposing of clothing, personal protective equipment or other equipment contaminated with an infectious material or organism that must be followed and indicate who is responsible for carrying out those activities;

(j) describe the training to be provided to workers who may be exposed and the means by which this training will be provided;

(k) require the investigation and documentation, in a manner that protects the confidentiality of the exposed worker, of any work-related exposure incident, including the route of exposure and the circumstances in which the exposure occurred; and

(l) require the investigation of any occurrence of an occupationally transmitted infection or infectious disease to identify the route of exposure and implement measures to prevent further infection.

(4) If subsection 85(2) applies to an employer on the day on which this section comes into force or at any time before January 1, 2006, that employer must, no later than January 1, 2006, describe in his or her exposure control plan the steps that will be taken by July 1, 2006 to ensure compliance with this section and, if applicable, subsection 474.1(3).

(5) No employer shall allow a worker to undertake any tasks or procedures mentioned in clause (3)(c) unless the worker has been trained with respect to the exposure control plan and the use of control measures appropriate for the task or procedure undertaken.

(6) An employer, in consultation with the committee, shall review the adequacy of the exposure control plan, and amend the plan if necessary, at least every two years or as necessary to reflect advances in infection control measures, including engineering controls.

(7) An employer shall make a copy of the exposure control plan and any amendments to that plan readily available to every worker who may be exposed. (8) An employer shall:

(a) inform workers who are required to handle, use or produce an infectious material or organism or who may be exposed at a place of employment:

(i) of any vaccine recommended for workers with respect to that risk in the Canadian Immunization Guide, published by Health Canada, and recommended by:

(A) a medical health officer appointed pursuant to The Public Health Act or a designated public health officer within the meaning of The Public Health Act, 1994 whose powers and responsibilities include those set out in Part IV of The Public Health Act, 1994; or

(B) a physician with expertise in immunization or the control of communicable diseases; and

(ii) of the risks associated with taking a vaccine mentioned in subclause (i);

(b) with the worker's consent, arrange for the worker to receive any vaccination recommended pursuant to subclause (a)(i) during the worker's normal working hours and reimburse the worker for any costs associated with receiving the vaccination; and

(c) if a worker cannot receive a vaccination mentioned in subclause (a)(i) during the worker's normal working hours, credit the worker's attendance for the vaccination as time at work and ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits.

(9) If a worker has been exposed to blood or potentially infectious bodily fluids at a place of employment, an employer shall, with the consent of the worker, during the worker's normal working hours, arrange for immediate medical evaluation and intervention by a qualified person in an approved manner and for confidential post-exposure counselling.

(10) If a worker cannot receive medical evaluation, medical intervention or post-exposure counselling during the worker's normal working hours, an employer shall credit the worker's attendance for evaluation, intervention or counselling as time at work and shall ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits.

(11) Nothing in these regulations prohibits an employer or contractor from purchasing supplies in bulk together with another employer or contractor but each employer or contractor is responsible for ensuring his or her compliance with these regulations.

[Sask. Reg. 6/97, s. 5; 112/2005, s. 4]

PART VII

Personal Protective Equipment

91. (1) Where there is a risk of injury to the head of a worker, an employer or contractor shall provide approved industrial protective headwear and require a worker to use it.

(2) The following places are deemed to be places where a worker is exposed to a risk described in subsection (1):

(a) a mine, mill or smelter;

(b) a forestry or sawmilling operation;

(c) a construction site;

(d) a drilling operation;

(e) an oil or gas servicing operation.

(3) Where a worker may contact an exposed energized electrical conductor, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved industrial protective headwear that is of adequate dielectric strength to protect the worker.

(4) Where a worker is required by these regulations to use industrial protective headwear, an employer or contractor shall provide to the worker:

(a) a suitable liner where it is necessary to protect the worker from cold conditions; and

(b) a retention system to secure the industrial protective headwear firmly to the worker's head where the worker is likely to work in conditions that may cause the headwear to dislodge.

(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that any industrial protective headwear provided to a worker pursuant to these regulations is fluorescent orange or other high visibility colour where:

(a) the worker is working in a forestry or sawmilling operation; or

(b) visibility of the worker is necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker.

(6) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to use any industrial protective headwear that:

(a) is damaged or structurally modified;

(b) has been subjected to severe impact; or

(c) has been painted or has been cleaned with solvents.

93. (1) Where there is a risk of irritation or injury to the face or eyes of a worker from flying objects or particles, splashing liquids, molten metal or ultraviolet, visible or infrared radiation, an employer or contractor shall provide industrial eye or face protectors and require the worker to use them.

(2) Where an industrial eye or face protector is required by these regulations to be provided or used, the industrial eye or face protector must be approved.

(3) An employer or contractor shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a worker does not perform electric are welding if another worker may be exposed to radiation from the are unless the other worker is using a suitable industrial eye protector or is protected from the radiation by a suitable screen.

(4) A worker shall not perform electric are welding if another worker may be exposed to radiation from the are unless the other worker is using a suitable industrial eye protector or is protected from the radiation by a suitable screen.

94. (1) Where there is a risk of injury to the skin of a worker from sparks, molten metal or radiation, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved protective clothing or covers or any other safeguard that provides equivalent protection for the worker.

(2) Where there is a risk of injury to the skin of a worker from fire or explosion, an employer or contractor shall provide the worker with, and require the worker to use, outer fire resistant clothing that:

(a) meets an approved industry standard; and

(b) is appropriate to the risk.

(3) Where there is a risk of injury to the skin of an electrical worker from arc flash, an employer or contractor shall provide the electrical worker with, and require the electrical worker to use, arc flash protection that meets an approved standard.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 5]

95. (1) Where a worker is at risk of a cut, puncture, irritation or abrasion to the worker's lower body, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker uses safety pants or chaps that are appropriate for the work being performed by the worker.

(2) A worker operating a chain saw is deemed to be exposed to the risk described in subsection (1).

96. (1) Subject to subsection (4), an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a worker uses footwear that is appropriate to the risks associated with the worker's place of employment and occupation; and

(b) a worker who may be at risk from a heavy or falling object or who may tread on a sharp object uses approved protective footwear.

(2) The following places are deemed to be places where a worker is exposed to a risk described in clause (1)(b):

(a) a mine, mill or smelter;

(b) a forestry or sawmilling operation;

(c) a construction site;

(d) a drilling operation;

(e) an oil or gas servicing operation.

(3) An employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide outer foot guards if there is substantial risk of a crushing injury to the foot of a worker; and

(b) provide approved protective footwear if the feet of a worker may be endangered by hot, corrosive or toxic substances.

(4) After consultation with the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers, an employer or contractor may:

(a) permit the following to use approved soft-soled footwear without puncture-proof plates in the soles:

(i) workers who are competent steel erectors engaged in the connection of structural components of a skeletal structure;

(ii) competent workers who are engaged in the installation of a roof; and

(b) impose any conditions that the employer or contractor considers appropriate on the use of footwear described in clause (a).

PART VIII

Noise Control and Hearing Conservation

111. (1) In every area where workers are required or permitted to work and the noise level may frequently exceed 80 dBA, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the noise level is measured in accordance with an approved method;

(b) in consultation with the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers, a competent person evaluates the sources of the noise and recommends corrective action; and

(c) the measurements, evaluation and recommendations are documented.

(2) An employer or contractor shall re-measure the noise level in accordance with subsection (1) where altering, renovating or repairing the place of employment, introducing new equipment to the place of employment or modifying any process at the place of employment may result in a significant change in noise levels or occupational noise exposure.

(3) An employer or contractor shall keep a record of the results of any noise level measurements conducted at the place of employment as long as the employer or contractor operates in Saskatchewan.

(4) On request, an employer or contractor shall make available to an affected worker a copy of the results of any measurements conducted.

(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that any area in which the measurements taken pursuant to subsection (1) show noise levels in excess of 80 dBA is clearly marked by a sign indicating the range of noise levels.

116.1 (1) An employer or contractor shall develop a written fall protection plan where:

(a) a worker may fall three metres or more; and

(b) workers are not protected by a guardrail or similar barrier.

(2) The fall protection plan required by subsection (1) must describe:

(a) the fall hazards at the worksite;

(b) the fall protection system to be used at the worksite;

(c) the procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system; and

(d) the rescue procedures to be used if a worker falls, is suspended by a personal fall arrest system or safety net and needs to be rescued.

(3) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a copy of the fall protection plan is readily available before work begins at a worksite where a risk of falling exists.

(4) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker is trained in the fall protection plan and the safe use of the fall protection system before allowing the worker to work in an area where a fall protection system must be used.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 11]

133. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who is at risk from vehicular traffic, whether on a public highway or at any other place of employment, is provided with and required to use a high visibility vest, armlets or other high visibility clothing.

(2) Where there is a danger to a worker from vehicular traffic on a public highway, an employer or contractor shall develop and implement a traffic control plan, in writing, to protect the worker from traffic hazards by the use of one or more of the following:

(a) warning signs;

(b) barriers;

(c) lane control devices;

(d) flashing lights;

(e) flares;

(f) conspicuously identified pilot vehicles;

(g) automatic or remote-controlled traffic control systems;

(h) designated signallers directing traffic.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) workers are trained in the traffic control plan developed pursuant to subsection (2); and

(b) the traffic control plan developed pursuant to subsection (2) is made readily available for reference by workers at the place of employment.

(4) An employer or contractor shall use designated signallers to control traffic on a public highway only where other methods of traffic control are not adequate or suitable.

(5) Where designated signallers are used to control traffic on a public highway, an employer or contractor shall provide:

(a) at least one designated signaller if:

(i) traffic approaches from one direction only; or

(ii) traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would be clearly visible to one another; and

(b) at least two designated signallers if traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would not be clearly visible to one another.

(6) Where there is or may be a hazard to a worker from traffic at a place of employment other than a public highway, an employer or contractor shall develop and implement a traffic control plan to protect the worker from traffic hazards.

(7) A traffic control plan required by subsection (6) must:

(a) be in writing;

(b) be made readily available for reference by workers at the place of employment; and

(c) set out, where appropriate:

(i) the maximum allowable speed of any vehicle or class of vehicles, including powered mobile equipment, in use at the place of employment;

(ii) the maximum operating grades;

(iii) the location and type of control signs;

(iv) the route to be taken by vehicles or powered mobile equipment;

(v) the priority to be established for classes of vehicle;

(vi) the location and type of barriers or restricted areas; and

(vii) the duties of workers and the employer or contractor.

(8) A worker who operates a vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment at a place of employment and who does not have a clear view of the path to be travelled shall not proceed until a person who has a clear view of the path to be travelled by the vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment signals to the worker that it is safe to proceed.

(9) Where a provision of this section conflicts with a provision of The Highway Traffic Act, The Highways and Transportation Act, The Vehicle Administration Act, a regulation made pursuant to any of those Acts or a bylaw of a municipality made pursuant to The Urban Municipality Act, 1984, The Rural Municipality Act, 1989 or The Northern Municipalities Act, the provision of the other statute, regulation or bylaw prevails.

(10) Nothing in this section applies to a peace officer in the performance of the peace officer's duties.

PART X

Machine Safety

139. (1) Subject to section 140, before a worker undertakes the maintenance, repair, test or adjustment of a machine other than a power tool, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the machine is locked out and remains locked out during that activity if not doing so would put the worker at risk.

(2) Before a worker undertakes the maintenance, repair, test or adjustment of a power tool, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the energy source has been isolated from the power tool, any residual energy in the power tool has been dissipated and the energy source remains isolated during that activity.

(3) An employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide a written lock-out process to each worker who is required to work on a machine to which subsection (1) applies; and

(b) where the lockout process uses a lock and key, issue to that worker a lock that is operable only by that worker's key and a duplicate key.

(4) Where the lockout process does not use a lock and key, an employer or contractor shall designate a person to co-ordinate and control the lockout process.

(5) Where the lockout process uses a lock and key, an employer or contractor shall designate a person to keep the duplicate key mentioned in clause (3)(b) and ensure that:

(a) the duplicate key is accessible only to the designated person; and

(b) a log book is kept to record the use of the duplicate key and the reasons for that use.

(6) Where it is not practicable to use a worker's key to remove a lock, an employer or contractor may permit the person designated pursuant to subsection (5) to remove the lock if the designated person:

(a) has determined the reason that the worker's key is not available;

(b) has determined that it is safe to remove the lock and activate the machine; and

(c) if a committee or representative is in place, has informed the co-chairpersons or the representative of the proposed use of the duplicate key before it is used.

(7) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a designated person who is permitted to use a duplicate key pursuant to subsection (6):

(a) records in the log book the use of the duplicate key, the reason for its use and the date of its use; and

(b) signs the log book each time that the duplicate key is used.

(8) Where a central automated system controls more than one machine, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the machine to be maintained, repaired, tested or adjusted is isolated from the central system before the lock-out procedures required by subsection (3) are implemented.

(9) Before undertaking any maintenance, repairs, tests or adjustments to a machine to which subsection (1) applies, a worker shall lock out the machine following the process mentioned in clause (3)(a).

(10) After a lock-out device has been installed or a lockout process has been initiated, the worker who installed the first lock or initiated the process shall check the machine to ensure that the machine is inoperative.

(11) No person shall deactivate a lockout process that does not use a lock and key except the person designated pursuant to subsection (4).

(12) No person shall remove a lock-out device except the worker who installed the lock-out device or the designated person acting in accordance with subsection (6).

160. An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a motor vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment that may be used in such a way that a worker other than the operator may be placed at risk by an unexpected reverse movement is equipped with a suitable warning device that operates automatically when the vehicle or equipment starts to move in reverse.

211. (1) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a crane is equipped with an effective warning device that can be readily activated by the operator and that is adequate to warn workers of the impending movement of the crane.

(2) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a crane that has a boom is equipped with:

(a) positive boom stops to prevent inadvertent movement of the boom;

(b) a boom stop limit device to prevent the boom from being drawn back beyond a predetermined safe boom angle identified by the manufacturer;

(c) a jib stop device to prevent the jib from being drawn back beyond the safe boom angle identified by the manufacturer, where a jib is attached to the boom; and

(d) a boom angle indicator that is clearly visible to the operator while seated at the control station.

(3) On and after January 1, 1998, an employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a crane is equipped with an anti two block warning device where the crane will be used to hoist workers on a personnel lifting unit or where the crane is a hydraulic crane with a rated load of nine tonnes or greater.

(4) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a hoist or crane that operates on rails, tracks or other guides is fitted with:

(a) a positive stop or limiting device installed on the hoist or crane or on the rails, tracks or other guides to prevent the hoist or crane from over-running safe limits or contacting other equipment that is on the same rail, track or other guide;

(b) sweepguards installed to prevent materials on the rail, track or other guide from causing dislodgment of the hoist or crane; and

(c) stops to prevent the crane or hoist from dropping more than 2.5 centimetres if the axle breaks.

(5) Where a worker leaves a crane or hoist unattended or parked, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the crane or hoist is stored in a manner that does not create a risk to any worker;

(b) the operating machinery is locked or rendered inoperative;

(c) the rigging and boom angle are secured; and

(d) a mobile crane is stored on level ground with the wheels locked or chocked.

236. (1) Where the dislodgment of a hook could injure a worker, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the hook is secured by a safety latch, mousing, shackle or other effective means, except where:

(a) skeleton steel is being hoisted or a similar operation is being performed while a sorting or grab hook is being used;

(b) power poles or telephone poles are being hoisted into place or removed using an approved S-hook;

(c) the design of the hook and the work practices used prevent dislodgement of the hook; or

(d) the health and safety of a worker disconnecting the hook would be placed at risk.

(2) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to use a hook where:

(a) the throat opening has been increased or the tip has been bent more than 10 out of plane from the hook body; or

(b) any dimension of the hook has been reduced by more than 10%.

(3) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to side load, back load or tip load a hook unless the hook has been specifically designed for that purpose.

(4) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that:

(a) a hook is clearly labelled with the maximum load of the hook in a location where a worker using the hook can easily see the rating; or

(b) the hook's maximum load is made readily available to workers.

(5) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to allow a load to bear against a safety latch, mousing or shackle.

PART XV

Robotics

242. (1) An employer, in consultation with the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers, shall:

(a) assess the potential hazards to a worker who is required or permitted to install, operate, teach or maintain a robot or robot system at the place of employment; and

(b) develop written safe work practices and procedures for the installation, operation, teaching and maintenance of robots and robot systems.

(2) An employer shall ensure that the workers are trained in and implement the safe work practices and procedures developed pursuant to clause (1)(b).

PART XVIII

Confined Space Entry

267. Where a worker may be required or permitted to work in a confined space, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall identify:

(a) types of confined spaces at the place of employment that a worker may be required or permitted to enter;

(b) types of hazards that are or may be present at each confined space;

(c) alternative means to perform the work to be performed in a confined space that will not require the worker to enter the confined space; and

(d) alterations to the physical characteristics of the confined spaces that may be necessary to ensure safe entrance to and exit from all accessible parts of each confined space.

270. (1) Before a worker is required or permitted to enter a confined space, an employer shall appoint a competent person:

(a) to assess the hazards;

(b) where a hazardous atmosphere has been identified, to test the atmosphere of the confined space for:

(i) oxygen enrichment or deficiency;

(ii) the presence of flammable or explosive substances; and

(iii) the presence and hazardous concentration of airborne chemical substances; and

(c) to determine whether:

(i) work activities or processes will result in the release of toxic, flammable or explosive concentrations of any substances during the worker's occupation of the confined space;

(ii) measures have been taken to ensure that a worker will not drown or become entrapped in any liquid or free-flowing solid present in the confined space;

(iii) the entry of any liquid, free-flowing solid or hazardous substance into the confined space in a quantity that could endanger the health or safety of the worker has been prevented;

(iv) all energy sources that present a hazard to a worker entering into, exiting from or occupying the confined space have been locked out, with the energy sources being put in a zero energy state;

(v) any hazards from biological substances are present in the confined space; and

(vi) the opening for entry into and exit from the confined space is sufficient to allow safe passage of a worker who is using personal protective equipment required by these regulations.

(2) When testing the atmosphere of a confined space pursuant to clause (1)(b), a competent person shall use appropriate and properly calibrated instruments that have been tested to ensure that the instruments are capable of operating safely and effectively.

(3) A competent person who carries out the activities described in clauses (1)(a) to (c) shall prepare a report in writing that sets out:

(a) the results of the assessment, tests and determinations;

(b) recommended special precautions and procedures to reduce the risk to a worker that are to be followed by a worker entering into, exiting from or occupying the confined space; and

(c) recommended personal protective equipment to be used by a worker entering the confined space.

272. (1) Where a worker will be required or permitted to enter a hazardous confined space, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop a hazardous confined space entry plan to ensure the health and safety of workers who enter or work in the hazardous confined space.

(2) A hazardous confined space entry plan must be in writing and must include:

(a) the tests or measurements necessary to monitor any oxygen deficiency or enrichment or the presence and hazardous concentration of flammable or explosive substances;

(b) the identification of any other hazards that may be present in the hazardous confined space and may put the health or safety of workers at risk;

(c) the means, if any, of isolating the hazardous confined space;

(d) the means, if any, of ventilating the hazardous confined space;

(e) the procedures to enter, work in and exit from the hazardous confined space safely;

(f) the availability, location and proper use of personal protective equipment;

(g) the rescue procedures to be followed, including the number and duties of personnel and the availability, location and proper use of equipment;

(h) the means to maintain effective communication with a worker who has entered the hazardous confined space; and

(i) the availability, location and proper use of any other equipment that a worker may need to work safely in the hazardous confined space.

(3) An employer shall ensure that the following workers are trained in and implement a hazardous confined space entry plan:

(a) a worker who is required or permitted to enter the hazardous confined space;

(b) a worker who attends a worker in the hazardous confined space pursuant to subsection 274(4) or (5);

(c) a worker who may be required or permitted to implement the rescue procedures mentioned in clause (2)(g).

(4) An employer shall make a copy of a hazardous confined space entry plan readily available at the entrance to the hazardous confined space.

PART XXI

Chemical and Biological Substances

302. (1) An employer shall, at a place of employment:

(a) monitor the use or presence of, or a worker's exposure to, any chemical substance or any biological substance that may be hazardous or harmful to the health or safety of a worker;

(b) where reasonably practicable, substitute a less hazardous or harmful chemical substance or biological substance for a hazardous or harmful chemical substance or biological substance;

(c) subject to subsection 307(1), to the extent that is reasonably practicable, reduce any contamination of the place of employment by a chemical substance or biological substance; and

(d) develop and implement work procedures and processes that are as safe as is reasonably practicable for the handling, use, storage, production and disposal of chemical substances and biological substances.

(2) An employer shall take all practicable steps to prevent exposure of a worker, to an extent that is likely to be harmful to the worker, to:

(a) a chemical substance or biological substance that may be hazardous; or

(b) a chemical substance or biological substance in combination or association with any other substance present that may be hazardous.

(3) An employer shall:

(a) inform the workers of the nature and degree of the effects to their health or safety of any chemical substance or biological substance to which the workers are exposed in the course of their work; and

(b) provide the workers with adequate training with respect to:

(i) work procedures and processes developed pursuant to clause (1)(d); and

(ii) the proper use of any personal protective equipment required by these regulations.

(4) An employer shall make available to the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers:

(a) the results of any measurements of worker exposure to, and contamination of a place of employment by, a chemical substance or biological substance; and

(b) any steps taken to reduce the contamination of a place of employment by, and eliminate or reduce exposure of the workers to, a chemical substance or biological substance.

303. (1) An employer shall, in consultation with the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers:

(a) develop and maintain a list of:

(i) all chemical substances and biological substances that are regularly handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of in the course of work processes and that may be hazardous to the health and safety of the workers at the place of employment; and

(ii) any other chemical substances or biological substances that may be present at the place of employment and are of concern to the workers; and

(b) identify on the list all chemical substances and biological substances that are controlled products.

(2) An employer shall:

(a) amend the list mentioned in subsection (1) whenever a chemical substance or biological substance is added to or removed from the place of employment;

(b) submit a copy of each amendment to the committee or the representative; and

(c) keep a copy of the list at the place of employment and make the list readily available to the workers.

304. (1) Where a chemical substance or biological substance listed pursuant to subsection 303(1) is not a controlled product or is a controlled product that is exempted from the application of The Occupational Health and Safety (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) Regulations , an employer shall take all reasonable steps to:

(a) ascertain and record the hazards that may arise from the handling, use, storage, production or disposal of the substance at the place of employment;

(b) ascertain and record the precautions that need to be taken with respect to the substance to ensure the health and safety of workers; and

(c) clearly mark the container holding the substance with the name of the substance as set out in the list.

(2) An employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop a program to instruct workers about the hazards of the substances to which subsection (1) applies and train workers in the precautions to be taken with respect to those substances.

(3) An employer shall implement a program developed pursuant to subsection (2).

[Sask. Reg. 43/2016, s. 3]

306. Where workers are required to handle, use, store, produce or dispose of any chemical substance listed in Table 20 of the Appendix, an employer shall:

(a) provide adequate engineering controls to prevent, to the extent that is reasonably practicable, the release of the substance into the place of employment; and

(b) take other measures and provide personal protective equipment that meets the requirements of Part VII to prevent, to the extent that is practicable, any significant risk to workers from the substance.

312. Where there may be a risk of substantial contamination of a worker or of a worker's clothing from corrosive or other harmful substances, an employer or contractor shall provide and maintain an approved and readily accessible means of bathing or showering the worker in lukewarm water.

313. Where there may be a risk to the eyes of a worker from corrosive or other harmful substances, an employer or contractor shall provide, at readily accessible locations, approved equipment to flush the eyes of the worker with lukewarm water or another appropriate liquid.

PART XXIII

Asbestos

334. (1) Subject to subsection (3), an employer, contractor or owner shall identify and keep a written record of the following materials that the employer, contractor or owner knows or may reasonably be expected to know are present in a place of employment and with which workers may come into contact:

(a) asbestos-containing material;

(b) subject to subsection (2), any material likely to contain asbestos.

(2) Any material likely to contain asbestos is deemed to be asbestos-containing material for the purposes of this Part until the material is determined to be asbestos-free.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall immediately identify the presence in a place of employment of all material that is likely to contain asbestos, is damaged or in poor repair and is likely to release asbestos dust into the atmosphere at the place of employment.

(4) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the identification and assessment of asbestos-containing materials pursuant to subsection (1) or the determination of asbestos-free materials pursuant to subsection (2) is performed only by a competent person.

(4.1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the written record mentioned in subsection (1) includes the following information for each asbestos-containing material or each type of asbestos-containing material:

(a) its location;

(b) its characteristics;

(c) its accessibility.

(4.2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the written record mentioned in subsection (1) is updated each time asbestos-containing material is added to or removed from the place of employment.

(5) An employer, contractor or owner shall make a copy of the written record mentioned in subsections (1), (3), (4.1) and (4.2) readily available for reference by:

(a) the committee;

(b) the representative; and

(c) the workers.

[Sask. Reg. 5/2014, s. 5]

342. An employer shall ensure that workers who are likely to be employed in an asbestos process or are likely to be exposed to asbestos dust are informed of the nature and extent of the risk to their health, including a warning that:

(a) the inhalation of asbestos may cause:

(i) pneumoconiosis;

(ii) lung cancer; or

(iii) mesothelioma; and

(b) the risk of injury to health caused by the inhalation of asbestos is increased by smoking.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 25]

PART XXV

Fire and Explosion Hazards

370. (1) Where a flammable substance is or may be present, an employer or contractor shall ensure that no hot work is performed until:

(a) suitable tests have been conducted that:

(i) indicate whether the atmosphere contains a flammable substance in a quantity sufficient to create an explosive atmosphere; and

(ii) confirm that the work may be safely performed; and

(b) the work procedures developed pursuant to clause 363(1)(b) have been implemented to ensure continuous safe performance of the work.

(2) While hot work is being performed, an employer or contractor shall conduct tests described in clause (1)(a) at intervals appropriate to the work being performed and record the results.

(3) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit any hot work to be performed in the vicinity of a material that may constitute a fire hazard until suitable steps have been taken to reduce the risk of fire.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a container or piping that contains or has contained a flammable substance is purged using an effective method to remove the flammable substance from the container or piping before any hot work is begun on that container or piping.

(5) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit any welding or cutting of metal that has been cleaned with a flammable or combustible liquid until the metal has thoroughly dried.

PART XXXI

Additional Protection for Health Care Workers

470. (1) Where workers are required or permitted to mobilize, lift, hold, turn, position or transfer patients, residents or clients, an employer:

(a) in consultation with the committee, shall develop a written program specifying:

(i) the procedures to be used by a competent person to assess whether a patient, resident or client requires assistance to move; and

(ii) subject to subsection (2), the procedures and techniques that workers must use when mobilizing, lifting, holding, turning, positioning or transferring a patient, resident or client under all reasonably foreseeable circumstances;

(b) shall implement the program developed pursuant to clause (a);

(c) shall make readily available for reference by workers a copy of the program developed pursuant to clause (a);

(d) where the program developed pursuant to clause (a) and implemented pursuant to clause (b) requires the use of equipment, shall provide equipment, sufficient in quantity, capacity and quality to protect the health and safety of workers, to assist with mobilizing, lifting, holding, turning, positioning or transferring patients, residents or clients;

(e) in consultation with the committee, shall develop a written plan respecting the ongoing evaluation and selection of the equipment mentioned in clause (d);

(f) shall consult with workers who use the equipment mentioned in clause (d) on the ongoing evaluation and selection of that equipment;

(g) shall ensure that workers use, and that competent persons maintain, the equipment mentioned in clause (d) according to the manufacturer's recommendations;

(h) shall ensure that a preventative maintenance program for the equipment mentioned in clause (d) is implemented that meets the manufacturer's recommendations; and

(i) shall ensure that workers:

(i) are instructed in the causes of injuries resulting from mobilizing, lifting, holding, turning, positioning or transferring patients, residents or clients and the means to prevent those injuries;

(ii) subject to subsection (2) and in addition to the requirements of section 19, are trained in, and use, the procedures and techniques of mobilizing, lifting, holding, turning, positioning and transferring patients, residents or clients as described in subclause (a)(ii); and

(iii) are trained in the use of the equipment mentioned in clause (d) that the workers will be expected to use at the worksite.

(2) The procedures and techniques mentioned in subclauses (1)(a)(ii) and (i)(ii) must be consistent with the requirements set out in section 81.

(3) Where a patient, resident or client has been assessed as requiring assistance to move, an employer shall:

(a) ensure that the status of the patient, resident or client and the appropriate techniques to mobilize, lift, hold, turn, position or transfer the patient, resident or client are clearly identified in writing or by other visual means at or near the location of the patient, resident or client; and

(b) where the technique specified in clause (a) requires more than one worker or the use of equipment, ensure that the number of workers needed and the equipment to be used are also clearly specified in writing or by other visual means at or near the location of the patient, resident or client.

(4) An employer, in consultation with the committee, shall review all injuries resulting from mobilizing, lifting, holding, turning, positioning or transferring patients, residents or clients to determine the causes of the injuries.

(5) An employer shall take appropriate action to prevent the occurrence of injuries similar to an injury reviewed pursuant to subsection (4).

(6) Where a program developed pursuant to clause (1)(a) and implemented pursuant to clause (1)(b), or a technique identified in subsection (3), specifies the use of equipment or the assistance of another worker, no employer shall require or permit a worker to mobilize, lift, hold, turn, position or transfer a patient, resident or client without the use of the device or the assistance of the other worker.

(7) Except in a life-threatening emergency, the employer shall not require or permit a worker to mobilize, lift, hold, turn, position or transfer a patient, resident or client until the patient, resident or client has been assessed pursuant to the program developed pursuant to clause (1)(a) and implemented pursuant to clause (1)(b).

[Sask. Reg. 91/2007, s. 5]

471. (1) In this section, "cytotoxic drugs" means drugs that inhibit or prevent the functions of cells and are manufactured, sold or represented for use in treating neoplastic or other conditions.

(2) An employer shall take all practicable steps to minimize the exposure of workers to cytotoxic drugs or to materials or equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs.

(3) On and after July 1, 1998, where workers prepare parenteral cytotoxic drugs on a frequent and continuing basis, an employer shall provide and maintain an approved biological safety cabinet in accordance with subsection (4) and ensure that workers use the cabinet safely.

(4) A biological safety cabinet must be:

(a) inspected and certified by a competent person at least annually and when the biological safety cabinet is moved; and

(b) used and maintained according to an approved procedure or the manufacturer's recommendations.

(5) Where workers are required to prepare, administer, handle or use cytotoxic drugs or are likely to be exposed to cytotoxic drugs, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop a written program to protect the health and safety of workers who may be exposed to cytotoxic drugs or to materials or equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs.

(6) A program developed pursuant to subsection (5) must include:

(a) the measures to be taken to identify, store, prepare, administer, handle, use, transport and dispose of cytotoxic drugs and materials contaminated with cytotoxic drugs;

(b) the emergency steps to be followed in the event of:

(i) a spill or leak of a cytotoxic drug; or

(ii) worker exposure to cytotoxic drugs by a puncture of the skin, absorption through the skin, contact with an eye, inhalation of drug dust or ingestion of a contaminated substance;

(c) the methods to be followed in maintaining and disposing of equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs;

(d) the use to be made of engineering controls, work practices, hygiene practices and facilities, approved respiratory protective devices, approved eye or face protectors and other personal protective equipment and decontamination materials and equipment that are appropriate in the circumstances; and

(e) the use to be made of an approved biological safety cabinet for the preparation of cytotoxic drugs and the methods to be followed in maintaining the cabinet.

(7) An employer shall:

(a) implement the program developed pursuant to subsection (5);

(b) ensure that all workers who may be exposed to cytotoxic drugs or to materials or equipment contaminated with cytotoxic drugs are trained in the program; and

(c) make a copy of the program readily available for reference by workers.

474. (1) An employer shall provide readily accessible containers for waste needles, syringes, blades, clinical glass and any other clinical items that are capable of causing a cut or puncture and shall ensure that workers and self-employed persons use those containers.

(2) The containers required by subsection (1) must:

(a) have a fill line;

(b) be clearly identified as containing hazardous waste; and

(c) be sturdy enough to resist puncture under normal conditions of use and handling until the containers are disposed of.

(3) An employer shall ensure that workers do not manually clip, bend, break or recap waste needles.

[Sask. Reg. 112/2005, s. 6]

474.1 (1) In this section and in section 474.2:

(a) "contaminated" means contaminated with:

(i) human blood;

(ii) fluids containing visible amounts of human blood;

(iii) any of the following potentially infectious human bodily fluids:

(A) semen;

(B) vaginal secretions;

(C) cerebrospinal fluid;

(D) synovial fluid;

(E) pleural fluid;

(F) pericardial fluid;

(G) peritoneal fluid;

(H) amniotic fluid;

(I) saliva;

(J) breast milk;

(iv) fluids from any unfixed tissue or organ, other than intact skin, from a human, living or dead;

(v) cell, tissue or organ cultures, or other solutions, that may contain a human blood-borne infectious organism; or

(vi) fluids from tissues of experimental animals infected with a blood-borne infectious organism from a human source;

(b) "needles with engineered sharps injury protections" means hollow bore needles or devices with hollow bore needles that:

(i) are commercially available;

(ii) are approved as medical devices by Health Canada;

(iii) have a built-in safety feature or mechanism that eliminates or minimizes the risk of a percutaneous injury; and

(iv) are used for purposes that include:

(A) withdrawing bodily fluids;

(B) accessing a vein or artery; and

(C) administering medications or other fluids;

(c) "needleless system" means a commercially available device approved as a medical device by Health Canada that replaces a hollow bore needle for use in:

(i) the collection of bodily fluids;

(ii) the withdrawal of bodily fluids after initial venous or arterial access is established;

(iii) the administration of medication or fluids; or

(iv) any other procedure in which it is reasonably anticipated that a worker could incur a percutaneous injury with a contaminated hollow bore needle;

(d) "public health emergency" means an occurrence or imminent threat of a significant risk to public health caused by:

(i) an epidemic or pandemic disease; or

(ii) a novel, highly fatal infectious agent or associated biological toxin.

(2) This section and section 474.2 apply:

(a) to all health care facilities mentioned in clause 468(b) except those mentioned in subclauses 468(b)(xiii) and (xiv);

(b) to a correctional facility as defined in The Correctional Services Act; and

(c) to a youth custody facility as defined in the Youth Criminal Justice Act (Canada).

(3) Subject to subsection (4), on and after July 1, 2006, for tasks and procedures in which it is reasonably anticipated that a worker or self-employed person may incur a percutaneous injury from a contaminated hollow bore needle, the employer or contractor must:

(a) identify, evaluate and select needles with engineered sharps injury protections or needleless systems, in consultation with representatives of those workers or self-employed persons who will use the selected device; and

(b) ensure that the needles with engineered sharps injury protections and needleless systems selected pursuant to clause (a) are used.

(4) Subsection (3) does not apply:

(a) if the employer or contractor can demonstrate that needles with engineered sharps injury protections or needleless systems pose an additional risk to the patient, worker or self-employed person;

(b) to any biological or antibiotic product in an injection-ready needle device that is present in Saskatchewan on the day on which this section comes into force;

(c) to any needles or needle devices that are obtained during a public health emergency for use in that emergency;

(d) to needles or needle devices for use in a public health emergency that are stockpiled for use in a public health emergency and are present in Saskatchewan on the day on which this section comes into force; or

(e) if a needle with engineered sharps injury protections or a needleless system requires Health Canada's approval for use in a national program, including blood collection and vaccination programs, until the earlier of:

(i) the day on which Health Canada approves a needle with engineered sharps injury protections or a needleless system for use in a national program; and

(ii) July 1, 2007.

[Sask. Reg. 112/2005, s. 7]

488. An employer, contractor or owner shall provide to a fire fighter who engages in or is exposed to the hazards of emergency operations, and ensure that the fire fighter uses, approved personal protective equipment that is appropriate to the nature of the risk to which the fire fighter will be exposed and that is adequate to protect the health and safety of the fire fighter.

491. An employer, contractor or owner shall provide for use by a fire fighter approved safety ropes, harnesses and hardware that are appropriate to the nature of the risk to which the fire fighter will be exposed and adequate to protect the health and safety of the fire fighter, and ensure that the fire fighter uses them.

WHMIS 2015 Regulations

4. (1) Subject to subsection (2), an employer shall ensure that a hazardous product is not used, stored or handled in a place of employment unless all the applicable requirements in these regulations with respect to labels, identifiers, safety data sheets and worker education and training are complied with.

(2) An employer may store a hazardous product in a place of employment while actively seeking information required pursuant to these regulations.

5. (1) An employer shall ensure that a worker who works with a hazardous product or may be exposed to a hazardous product in the course of his or her work activities is informed about:

(a) all hazard information received by the employer from a supplier concerning that hazardous product; and

(b) any further hazard information that the employer is, or ought reasonably to be, aware of concerning the use, storage, handling and disposal of that hazardous product.

(2) If a hazardous product is produced in a place of employment, an employer shall ensure that a worker who works with a hazardous product or may be exposed to a hazardous product in the course of his or her work activities is informed about all hazard information that the employer is, or ought reasonably to be, aware of concerning the use, storage, handling and disposal of that hazardous product.

(3) An employer shall ensure that a worker who works with a hazardous product or may be exposed to a hazardous product in the course of his or her work activities is educated and trained respecting:

(a) the content that is required to appear on a supplier label and workplace label for the hazardous product and the purpose and significance of the information contained on those labels;

(b) the content that is required to appear on a safety data sheet for a hazardous product and the purpose and significance of the information contained on the safety data sheet;

(c) all necessary procedures for the safe use, storage, handling and disposal of the hazardous product;

(d) all necessary procedures to be followed if fugitive emissions are present where workers may be exposed to those fugitive emissions; and

(e) all necessary procedures to be followed in case of an emergency involving a hazardous product.

(4) An employer shall ensure that the education and training required by subsection (3) is developed and implemented:

(a) for that employer’s place of employment; and

(b) in consultation with the occupational health committee, if there is an occupational health committee.

(5) An employer shall ensure that:

(a) the education and training required by subsection (3) results in a worker being able to apply the information as needed to protect the health and safety of that worker or any other worker;

(b) the necessary procedures mentioned in clauses (3)(c) to (e) are implemented; and

(c) the knowledge of the workers is periodically evaluated using written tests, practical demonstrations or other suitable means.

(6) An employer shall review at least annually, or more frequently if required by a change in work conditions or available hazard information, the education and training programs provided to workers on the safe use, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous products, in consultation with:

(a) the occupational health committee;

(b) the occupational health and safety representative; or

(c) if there is no occupational health committee or occupational health and safety representative, a worker representative.

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These forms do not replace the legislation. Please carefully review the Disclaimer on each form that you choose to use, and refer to the relevant legislation to find out exactly what requirements apply to your business. WorkSafe Saskatchewan assumes no responsibility or liability for the use of these forms, nor does WorkSafe Saskatchewan offer any advice as to your obligations under any applicable legislation.

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